Ring of the Nibelung


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Ring of the Nibelung

n
1. (European Myth & Legend) German myth a magic ring on which the dwarf Alberich placed a curse after it was stolen from him
2. (Classical Music) the four operas by Wagner, Das Rheingold (1869), Die Walküre (1870), Siegfried (1876), and Götterdämmerung (1876), based on this myth. Often shortened to: The Ring
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for supply of 26 fall prevention equipment for the tetralogy "the ring of the nibelung"
Die Walkre, the second opera in Wagner's The Ring of the Nibelung opera cycle, was successfully staged at Lyric Opera of Chicago a year ago, and Das Rheingold u during the 2016-2017 season.
Wagner's compositions include The Ring of the Nibelung and Tristan und Isolde .
The festival program is complemented by a short version of "The Ring of the Nibelung" for children.
The story that Tolkien tells is an original one, but the telling of it draws on many Celtic, Germanic, and Nordic mythological and legendary sources; thus, the similarities to Richard Wagner's epic "The Ring of the Nibelung" operatic tetralogy (a four-opera work), one of the towering monuments in Western art--as Tolkien drew on some of the same myths as Wagner.
The author organized the main body of his text in seven chapters devoted to Richard WagnerEs ideal, art and philosophy, an outline of the drama Jesus of Nazareth, The Ring of the Nibelung or Tetralogy, Tristan and Isolde, Parsifal, and a variety of other related subjects.
Still in Dresden, he wrote a sketch of a Nibelung legend in 1848, and while in exile in Switzerland he completed the poetic libretti of the four-part Ring of the Nibelung, destined to be the grandest multi-media work of art of the nineteenth century.
The Ring of the Nibelung is a 15-hour tetralogy that remains the most ambitious work of art ever produced.
Wagner's 'Ring' cycle - Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung) - is reputedly a monster: four operas telling an epic tale of gods and dwarves and giants through music which, once heard, is never likely to be forgotten.
Emslie cites Schopenhauer and Freud is his analysis of The Ring of the Nibelung, Tristan und Isolde, Die Meistersingers and Parsifal.
At the time of his birth, Germany was not yet a single nation and Wagner had yet to finish the Ring of the Nibelung. At the time of Strauss's death, Germany had been divided into East and West, and American soldiers were whistling "Some Enchanted Evening" in the streets.