ringingly


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ringingly

(ˈrɪŋɪŋlɪ)
adv
in a ringing manner
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps for this reason, the journal sometimes seemed a few steps behind, as when, in an April 1968 manifesto, Hentoff ringingly demanded something like the cinema verite that had been around for nearly a decade.
Richard Belshaw sings ringingly as the love-rat pro-consul Pollione, Katherine Cooper shows immense promise (she might well turn to Wagner) as his seducee Adalgisa, and as his previous seducee, mother to his two children, and Druid priestess, Sarah Helsby-Hughes is simply outstanding as the eponymous Norma.
He had volume to spare and his ringingly powerful tenor sailed effortlessly each song setting the tone for the evening.
ONLINE 359, 363 (2014) [hereinafter O'Shea III] ("Personal defense, not hunting, is the right's 'core lawful purpose.'"); O'Shea II, supra note 147, at 351 ("Finally, at the heart of Heller is the purpose of self-defense against criminal violence, which Justice Antonin Scalia's opinion for the Court ringingly endorses as 'the core lawful purpose' served by the Second Amendment right to arms.
ringingly declared "[i]t is emphatically the province and duty of
In 1987, the FCC followed the high court and ringingly declared that "the intrusion by government into the content of programming occasioned by the enforcement of the [Fairness Doctrine] unnecessarily restricts the journalistic freedom of broadcasters [and] actually inhibits the presentation of controversial issues of public importance to the detriment of the public and in degradation of the editorial prerogative of broadcast journalists."
Kenwright doesn't even deign to acknowledge Chelsea by name, but that's the only part of his statement which isn't ringingly clear.
He said that government should be "the idea of family, mutuality, the sharing of benefits and burdens for the good of all, feeling one another's pain, sharing one another's blessings--reasonably, honestly, fairly, without respect to race, or sex, or geography, k or political affiliation." President Obama has said, less ringingly, that "kindness" accounts for all of his political principles.
It would be fair to say that the West's defense of intellectual freedom was ringingly ambivalent.
Watts might have supported Simons's right to be at the dance, he might have ringingly asserted that excluding Simons for no reason other than his "complexion" was contrary to the tenets of equality.
I have a memory of a small, immaculately uniformed man with a sharp, foxish nose and a ringingly clear voice.