Ripuarian


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Rip·u·ar·i·an

 (rĭp′yo͞o-âr′ē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a group of Franks who settled along the Rhine, near Cologne, in the fourth century ad.
n.
A Ripuarian Frank.

[From Medieval Latin Ripuārius.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Ripuarian

(ˌrɪpjʊˈɛərɪən)
adj
1. (Peoples)
a. of or relating to the group of Franks who lived during the 4th century near Cologne along the Rhine
b. of or designating their code of laws
2. (Historical Terms)
a. of or relating to the group of Franks who lived during the 4th century near Cologne along the Rhine
b. of or designating their code of laws
n
3. (Peoples) a Ripuarian Frank
4. (Historical Terms) a Ripuarian Frank
[C18: from Medieval Latin Ripuārius, perhaps from Latin rīpa a river bank]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Rip•u•ar•i•an

(ˌrɪp yuˈɛər i ən)

adj.
of, pertaining to, or denoting a major division of the Franks, settled mainly between the Rhine and Meuse rivers by a.d. c400.
[1775–85; < Medieval Latin Ripuāri(us) + -an1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The first of the volumes five sections, "Precursors," begins with Carla Dauvenvan Knippenberg's insightful and connective case study, "Borderline Texts: The Case of the Maastricht (Ripuarian) Passion Play" (on the early life of Mary Magdalene) offers a significant reconsideralion of this redemption play's fourteenth-century historical backgrounds based on manuscript details, in which the Cistercian Lindburgse Sermoenen (Lindburgh Sermons) are also recorded.
The first two essays consider early rhetorician texts: the fourteenth-century Maastricht Passion Play written in the Ripuarian dialect and the fifteenth-century Bliscapen texts on the Joys of Mary.
Although drama does not feature prominently in this collection, the intriguing borderline text of the so-called Maastricht (Ripuarian) Passion Play is considered in its potential double role: reading text in dialogue form and performance text.
Conveniently, Hartmut Beckers deals with the related topic of an unknown Ripuarian Franconian redaction of Williram's commentary from c.