riser

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ris·er

 (rī′zər)
n.
1. One who rises, especially from sleep: a late riser.
2. The vertical part of a stair step.
3. A platform, as for elevating a group of people above a crowd, often arranged with similar platforms in tiers.

riser

(ˈraɪzə)
n
1. a person who rises, esp from bed: an early riser.
2. (Architecture) the vertical part of a stair or step
3. (Architecture) a vertical pipe, esp one within a building

ris•er

(ˈraɪ zər)

n.
1. a person who rises, esp. from bed.
2. the vertical face of a stair step.
3.
a. a long low platform on which persons can stand for greater visibility, as on a stage.
b. risers, a group of such platforms connected in stepwise fashion, often used for sitting.
4. a vertical pipe, duct, or conduit.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.riser - a person who rises (especially from bed)riser - a person who rises (especially from bed); "he's usually a late riser"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
early bird - a person who gets up very early in the morning
2.riser - a vertical pipe in a building
pipage, pipe, piping - a long tube made of metal or plastic that is used to carry water or oil or gas etc.
3.riser - structural member consisting of the vertical part of a stair or step
stair, step - support consisting of a place to rest the foot while ascending or descending a stairway; "he paused on the bottom step"
structural member - support that is a constituent part of any structure or building
Translations

riser

[ˈraɪzəʳ] N
1. to be an early/late riserser madrugador(a)/dormilón/ona
2. [of stair] → contrahuella f

riser

[ˈraɪzər] n
to be an early riser → être matinal(e), être un lève-tôt
to be a late riser → être un lève-tard
[stair] → contremarche f

riser

n
(= person) to be an early riserFrühaufsteher(in) m(f)sein, früh aufstehen; to be a late riserspät aufstehen, ein Langschläfer m/eine Langschläferin sein (inf)
(of stair)Setzstufe f
(for gas, water etc) → Steigrohr nt, → Steigleitung f

riser

[ˈraɪzəʳ] n to be an early/late riseressere mattiniero/a/alzarsi sempre tardi
References in classic literature ?
I could not but wonder at Lys' absence from the table, for she had always been one of the earliest risers in camp; so about nine o'clock, becoming apprehensive lest she might be indisposed, I went to the door of her room and knocked.
It will not be doubted that the next morning we were early risers, and as soon as I could catch the faintest glimpse of anything like daylight I shook my companion by the arm, and told him it was sunrise.
His brothers, of course, were early risers, but he should anticipate them by at least an hour and a half, and the little room which he had to himself as only an occasional visitor, had its window over the horse-block, so that he could slip out through the window without the least difficulty.
THE STOUT YEOMEN of Sherwood Forest were ever early risers of a morn, more especially when the summertime had come, for then in the freshness of the dawn the dew was always the brightest, and the song of the small birds the sweetest.
Many of them are not early risers at the brightest of times, being birds of night who roost when the sun is high and are wide awake and keen for prey when the stars shine out.
In town the earliest risers were just beginning to look sleepily from their windows as we drove through the streets of the Surrey side.
Always the earliest riser among the ladies of the house, Miss Garth was alo ne in the breakfast-room when the letter was brought in.
The age of this gentleman of ours was bordering on fifty; he was of a hardy habit, spare, gaunt-featured, a very early riser and a great sportsman.
They might have quarrelled, or Mr d'Urberville might still be asleep, for he was not an early riser.
But he's a very early riser, and I dare say he's in the Library already.
Salton had all his life been an early riser, and necessarily an early waker.
With respect to the pleasures of sense, he ought to do directly contrary to the practice of some tyrants at present; for they do not only continually indulge themselves in them for many days together, but they seem also to desire to have other witnesses of it, that they may wonder at their happiness; whereas he ought really to be moderate in these, and, if not, to appear to others to avoid them-for it is not the sober man who is exposed either to plots or contempt, but the drunkard; not the early riser, but the sluggard.