risk-taking


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risk-taking

n
1. the practice of taking action which might have undesirable consequences
2. (Banking & Finance) the practice of taking action which might have undesirable consequences
References in periodicals archive ?
That risk is that they are overtaken by new, disruptive technology not contemplated by a carefully-crafted business model or that investors lose interest due to lack of risk-taking and failure to provide the opportunity for investors to take some real risk and gain some real upside.
Do differences in performance have an impact on the appetite for risk-taking in decision-makers?
Hitting out at European regulators, the bank's CEO said that capital requirements form 'a noose' for banks, discouraging risk-taking and threatening their role in funding the economy.
Lejuez reported that blue balloons provide a better measure of risk-taking behavior due to their wider range of variabilities (8).
Weaver, Ph.D., from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues used data from high school students who responded to the Youth Risk Behavior Survey during February 2007 to May 2015 to examine correlations between sleep duration and personal safety risk-taking behaviors.
The year ahead presents 'perfect market conditions' for risk-taking, which makes investing in equity index funds an attractive option for investors who are looking for higher returns.
Advice, counseling and sensitive handling are important if they fall prey to such negative risk-taking. Certain risk-taking decisions like taking team-sports, making friends, voluntary activities and career choice should be allowed.
Those, in turn, serve as the pathway through which men's greater inherent competitiveness and risk-taking affect behavior.
Indiana University researchers analyzed samples from 19,453 participants that focused on the relationship between mental health and conformity to 11 norms generally considered to be masculine traits (e.g., the need for emotional control, risk-taking, desire to win, violence, and pursuit of status).
So, a combination of a risk-taking buyer and optimistic seller will result in the highest price being offered for the merger or acquisition deal.
Hypothesis 1: People who experience benign envy will be more likely to engage in risk-taking behavior than will those who experience malicious envy.
Risk-taking by young children can lead to unintentional injury and, in some cases, hospitalization, permanent disability, and death [1-6].