robber fly

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Related to Robber flies: family Asilidae

robber fly

n.
Any of numerous predatory flies of the family Asilidae, characteristically having long bristly legs.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

robber fly

n
(Animals) any of the predatory dipterous flies constituting the family Asilidae, which have a strong bristly body with piercing mouthparts and which prey on other insects. Also called: bee killer or assassin fly
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rob′ber fly`


n.
any of numerous, often large, dipterous insects of the family Asilidae that are predaceous on other insects.
[1870–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.robber fly - swift predatory fly having a strong body like a bee with the proboscis hardened for sucking juices of other insects captured on the wingrobber fly - swift predatory fly having a strong body like a bee with the proboscis hardened for sucking juices of other insects captured on the wing
dipteran, dipteron, dipterous insect, two-winged insects - insects having usually a single pair of functional wings (anterior pair) with the posterior pair reduced to small knobbed structures and mouth parts adapted for sucking or lapping or piercing
Asilidae, family Asilidae - robber flies
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
As such, I see robber flies, praying mantises, ladybugs, and other predators throughout the gardening season.
Las moscas del genero Smeryngolaphria Hermann, 1912 pertenecen a Asilidae, cuyos miembros son conocidos comunmente como "moscas ladronas" (Robber flies), siendo uno de los grupos de mayor riqueza de especies dentro del orden Diptera, con 555 generos y mas de 7500 especies descritas (Pape et al.
Two fly taxa, robber flies (Diptera: Asilidae) and hunter flies (the species Coenosia attenuata Stein; Diptera: Muscidae), the latter a recent entry into the US fauna from the Old World (Pons 2005), are well known for their classical, textbook, "hawking" behavior in catching prey.
Hermannomyia Oldroyd, 1980 is a small (two described species) genus of Afrotropical robber flies that has until now been recorded only from southern Africa (Londt 1981).
The Asilidae is a large and diverse family of predatory dipterans commonly known as robber flies. The family includes roughly 7000 described species worldwide and about 1000 in the Nearctic Region (Poole, 1996; Ghahari et al., 2007).
Their discovery revealed that some of the earliest animals possessed very powerful vision; similar eyes are found in many living insects, such as robber flies. Sharp vision must therefore have evolved very rapidly, soon after the first predators appeared during the 'Cambrian Explosion' of life that began around 540 million years ago.
Robber flies (Diptera: Asilidae) represent a large family of predatory insects with roughly 1,000 North American species and over 7,000 species worldwide (Borror et al., 1989; Ghahari et al., 2007).
Nissans crowd the junctions, impatient as robber flies. Trapped amongst them are lorries with raised exhausts, buses painted with the moon and stars, come south from Kurdistan.
Musso (1981) studied the morphology and development of the immature stages of some robber flies and classified the eggs into three groups; pigmented eggs, unlimited ones, and eggs covered with sand.
Robber flies can be beneficial to gardeners, with their big appetites for grasshoppers, mosquitoes and other insects, but many are generalists that will dine on whatever crosses their flight paths.
You'll learn how the highway robber flies got their name, what insects live and hunt under water, and even the difference between insects and what scientists call "true bugs."
Countryside management officer Jerry Lewis said, 'Discovering so many of these rare hornet robber flies is proof that we can be proud of Castle Meadows for yet another reason - the quality of its cattle and horse dung.'