robber

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rob

 (rŏb)
v. robbed, rob·bing, robs
v.tr.
1.
a. Law To take property from (a person) illegally by using or threatening to use violence or force; commit robbery upon.
b. To steal something from (a place, vehicle, or institution, for example): Bandits robbed the train.
c. To steal (money or valuables): robbed money out of the till.
2.
a. To deprive unjustly of something belonging to, desired by, or legally due (someone): robbed her of her professional standing.
b. To deprive of something injuriously: a parasite that robs a tree of its sap.
v.intr.
To engage in or commit robbery.
Idioms:
rob Peter to pay Paul
To incur a debt in order to pay off another debt.
rob (someone) blind
To rob in an unusually deceitful or thorough way: robbed the old couple blind while employed as a companion.
rob the cradle Informal
To have a romantic or sexual relationship with someone significantly younger than oneself.

[Middle English robben, from Old French rober, of Germanic origin; see reup- in Indo-European roots.]

rob′ber n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rob•ber

(ˈrɒb ər)

n.
a person who robs.
[1125–75; Middle English robbere < Old French robere. See rob, -er1]
syn: See thief.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

thief

robberburglar

Anyone that steals can be called a thief. A robber often uses violence or the threat of violence to steal things from places such as banks or shops.

They caught the armed robber who raided a supermarket.

A burglar breaks into houses or other buildings and steals things.

The average burglar spends just two minutes inside your house.
Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.robber - a thief who steals from someone by threatening violencerobber - a thief who steals from someone by threatening violence
bank robber - a robber of banks
mugger - a robber who takes property by threatening or performing violence on the person who is robbed (usually on the street)
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

robber

noun thief, raider, burglar, looter, stealer, fraud, cheat, pirate, bandit, plunderer, mugger (informal), highwayman, con man (informal), fraudster, swindler, brigand, grifter (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), footpad (archaic) Armed robbers broke into a jewellers.
Related words
fear harpaxophobia
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

robber

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
سَارِقلِص، سارِق، نَهّاب
разбойник
lupičzloděj
røver
ryöstäjäryöväri
pljačkaš
rabló
ræningi
強盗
강도
lupič
ropar
rånare
โจร
kẻ cướp

robber

[ˈrɒbəʳ]
A. Nladrón/ona m/f; (= bankrobber) → atracador(a) m/f; (= highwayman) → salteador m (de caminos); (= brigand) → bandido m
B. CPD robber baron N (pej) → magnate mf desaprensivo/a
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

robber

[ˈrɒbər] nbandit m, voleur m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

robber

nRäuber(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

robber

[ˈrɒbəʳ] nladro/a; (armed) → rapinatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

rob

(rob) past tense, past participle robbed verb
1. to steal from (a person, place etc). He robbed a bank / an old lady; I've been robbed!
2. (with of) to take (something) away from; to deprive of. An accident robbed him of his sight at the age of 21.
ˈrobber noun
The bank robbers got away with nearly $50,000.
ˈrobberyplural ˈrobberies noun
the act of robbing. Robbery is a serious crime; He was charged with four robberies.

to rob a bank or a person; to steal a watch, pencil, money etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

robber

سَارِق zloděj røver Räuber κλέφτης atracador ryöstäjä voleur pljačkaš rapinatore 強盗 강도 overvaller raner rabuś ladrão грабитель rånare โจร soyguncu kẻ cướp 强盗
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
They drove through the dark wood; but the carriage shone like a torch, and it dazzled the eyes of the robbers, so that they could not bear to look at it.
'Why, I see a table spread with all kinds of good things, and robbers sitting round it making merry.'
``A forfeit a forfeit,'' shouted the robbers; ``a Saxon hath thirty zecchins, and returns sober from a village!
Black robber bees are swiftly and stealthily prowling about the combs, and the short home bees, shriveled and listless as if they were old, creep slowly about without trying to hinder the robbers, having lost all motive and all sense of life.
But I doubt not that even in England you have had much to suffer from the hands of robbers and outlaws."
When you going to start the gang and turn robbers?"
We had been travelling for about a month, when one day we saw a cloud of dust moving swiftly towards us; and as soon as it came near, we found that the dust concealed a band of fifty robbers. Our men barely numbered half, and as we were also hampered by the camels, there was no use in fighting, so we tried to overawe them by informing them who we were, and whither we were going.
These men were not so much mere robbers as gamblers.
It was quite obvious, therefore, that it was the gate; especially as there was no doubt regarding the time at which the change had taken place, because all three remembered that they had come in sight of the robbers at the instant of its occurance.
Look too, at my feathers-- they are not the least like those of a Crane." The Farmer laughed aloud and said, "It may be all as you say, I only know this: I have taken you with these robbers, the Cranes, and you must die in their company."
A ROBBER who had plundered a Merchant of one thousand pieces of gold was taken before the Cadi, who asked him if he had anything to say why he should not be decapitated.
When his father had gone, a robber passed by and saw the horse grazing without any one watching it, for of course he could not see the Hazel-nut child hidden in the grass.