Musil

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Musil

(German ˈmuːzɪl)
n
(Biography) Robert (ˈroːbɛrt). 1880–1942, Austrian novelist, whose novel The Man Without Qualities (1930–42) is an ironic examination of contemporary ills
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
He discusses Liliencron, captain of the 19th century: naturalism as martial phonography; bring the war home: tympanic transductions from the battlefield to fin-de-diecle Vienna; drumming literature into the ground: Dada's tympanic regime; toward a modernist ear: Robert Musil and the poetics of acoustic space; into the inaudible: sound and imperception in Kafka's late writings, and Nazi soundscapes and their reverberation in postwar culture.
The fierce old Russians demand your time and your concentration; David Foster Wallace's mad, brilliant Infinite Jest is an infuriating joy; Robert Musil's great, unfinished The Man Without Qualities captivated me.
There is a fascinating old novel, "The Man Without Qualities" by Robert Musil. It is a portrait of an Austrian fellow at the turn of the 20th century when everything was changing -- business, finance, industry, politics, social life, norms and values.
While postmodern in its construction (the narrative keeps hopping forward and backward between years and periods), Nadas's new book still has much in common with the modern novels of Thomas Mann and Robert Musil.
Ses rencontres avec les intellectuels tels qu'Alban Berg, Bertolt Brecht, Robert Musil, George Grosz et autres, se multipliaient.
Thus, he has inspired art and artists, from Thomas Mann and Robert Musil to Rilke and Hermann Hesse, from Strauss' Thus Spoke Zarathustra and Mahler's Third Symphony to contemporary Hungarian director Bela Tarr's The Turin Horse; he has influenced philosophy, from Martin Heidegger and the early thinkers of the Frankfurt School (Adorno and Horkheimer) and existentialism, to the radical French postmodern philosophers of the second half of the 20th century (Foucault, Deleuze, Derrida); and, though to a considerably lesser degree, after being rehabilitated by Princeton University's Walter Kaufmann in the 1950s, Nietzsche has also gained some repute in American philosophical academia.
From this premise, this project will analyze three prominent German intellectuals of the Weimar period: the artist Hugo Ball, the novelist Thomas Mann, and the essayist Robert Musil. Beyond their public presence and wealth of publications, these three intellectuals offered valuable critiques of the Weimar period predicated on their own singular understandings of the German past, and their writings would go on to shape notions of German identity in the following decades.
In Man without Qualities, Robert Musil debated "the increasing role of medicine and psychiatry in legalistic definitions of sexual pathologies" (118).