rock flour

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rock flour

n.
Finely ground rock particles produced by glacial abrasion.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rock flour

n
(Geological Science) very finely powdered rock, produced when rocks are ground together (as along the faces of a moving fault or during the motion of glaciers) and are thus chemically unweathered
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Like a normal comet, it ejects or outgases material, but that material consists of rock dust rather than the ice-related vapors typical of comets.
If the hot weather continues the council's grit lorries are on standby to go out and spread crushed rock dust - a common method used to create a non-stick surface and limit damage to the road surface.
As temperatures soar some councils have deployed the trucks to spread rock dust.
They are normally deployed during cold snaps to stop road surfaces from freezing, but a number of councils are using the vehicles to spread crushed rock dust as temperatures soar.
Sedimentary rock forms when rock dust and debris accumulate on a planet's surface and cement over time.
Dust could have a similar impact if it is conductive in nature (such as fine rock dust).
is extracting a pure form of limestone just south of Grants that is ground into rock dust, which is used by coal power plants to scrub exhaust emissions and for dust control in underground coal mines to prevent explosions.
Several investigations were carried out on the cubes and beams to assess the compressive, flexural strengths of the concrete made of the Quarry Rock Dust for three diverse proportions and five dissimilar techniques.
In the long term they may have health problems caused by continued exposure to rock dust, skeletal damage due to transporting heavy loads and toxic poison from mercury used to bind the gold.
That's the most common approach in coal mines: spreading limestone or rock dust throughout the mine so that if dust started to lift from some kind of disturbance, it wouldn't explode.