rolling friction

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rolling friction

n
(Mechanical Engineering) engineering frictional resistance to rotation or energy losses in rolling bearings. Compare sliding friction
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The four solid tire types SC20+, CS20+, CSEasy SC20+ and SH12+ are equipped with the new Plus compound which combines the advantages of high mileage with low rolling resistance.
Just as some tires provide lower rolling resistance, depending on their construction and compounds, a conveyor belt can also be designed to provide lower resistance as it rolls over the supporting idlers.
For both methods, assumptions about the manner in which external forces such as rolling resistance and aerodynamic drag behave with speed are then used to identify the drag area ([Z.
Based on this, the ECOPIA range of tyres utilizes unique com- pounds and cutting-edge technology in tread design that reduces rolling resistance which in turn lowers fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.
The SmartWay(R)-verified tyre is guaranteed to generate 20 percent more mileage than competitor line-haul steer tyres, while also delivering 5 percent better rolling resistance than the MICHELIN(R) XZA3(R)+ tyre it replaces.
N'blue ECO adopted the low rolling resistance compound to maximize the energy efficiency by minimizing the rotation resistance on the surface.
When moving over ground, resistive energy losses occur because of a combination of rolling resistance, bearing resistance, tire scrub, and other frictional factors such as drag and frame flexion [2,9].
These high-performance rubber products offer tyre manufacturers even better options for producing energy-efficient tyres with low rolling resistance.
The ologic tyres have especially large diameters and narrow treads, which reduce tyre deformation and loss of energy during driving, helping to reduce rolling resistance, while at the same time keeping safety levels at least at the same level as conventional tyres.
The company stated the PROPEL E7 carbon black is engineered to reduce tire rolling resistance and improve vehicle fuel economy.
In addition to its application in the automotive industry for low rolling resistance tires, silica is also used in the food and animal feed industries, and in the paint and coatings industry.
Its production is in response to the new tyre labelling legislation introduced last November, and with its BA rating - B for rolling resistance and A for wet grip - takes the company closer to the ultimate AA rating manufacturers aim to get into production as soon as possible.