Roman Empire


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Related to Roman Empire: Greek Empire, Byzantine Empire, Roman Emperors

Roman Empire

also Rome  (rōm)
An empire that succeeded the Roman Republic during the time of Augustus, who ruled from 27 bc to ad 14. At its greatest extent it encompassed territories stretching from Britain and Germany to North Africa and the Persian Gulf. After 395 it was split into the Byzantine Empire and the Western Roman Empire, which rapidly sank into anarchy under the onslaught of Germanic invaders from the north and east. The last emperor of the West, Romulus Augustulus (born c. 461), was deposed by Goths in 476, the traditional date for the end of the empire.

Roman Empire

n
1. (Historical Terms) the territories ruled by ancient Rome. At its height under Trajan, the Roman Empire included W and S Europe, Africa north of the Sahara, and SW Asia. In 395 ad it was divided by Theodosius into the Eastern Roman Empire whose capital was Byzantium and which lasted until 1453, and the Western Roman Empire which lasted until the sack of Rome in 476
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the territories ruled by ancient Rome. At its height under Trajan, the Roman Empire included W and S Europe, Africa north of the Sahara, and SW Asia. In 395 ad it was divided by Theodosius into the Eastern Roman Empire whose capital was Byzantium and which lasted until 1453, and the Western Roman Empire which lasted until the sack of Rome in 476
3. (Historical Terms) the government of Rome and its dominions by the emperors from 27 bc
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the government of Rome and its dominions by the emperors from 27 bc
5. (Historical Terms) the Byzantine Empire
6. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the Byzantine Empire
7. (Historical Terms) the Holy Roman Empire
8. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the Holy Roman Empire

Ro′man Em′pire


n.
1. the lands and peoples subject to the authority of ancient Rome.
2. the imperial form of government established in Rome in 27 B.C., comprising the Principate or Early Empire (27 B.C. – A.D. 284) and the Autocracy or Later Empire (A.D. 284–476).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Roman Empire - an empire established by Augustus in 27 BC and divided in AD 395 into the Western Roman Empire and the eastern or Byzantine EmpireRoman Empire - an empire established by Augustus in 27 BC and divided in AD 395 into the Western Roman Empire and the eastern or Byzantine Empire; at its peak lands in Europe and Africa and Asia were ruled by ancient Rome
ancients - people who lived in times long past (especially during the historical period before the fall of the Roman Empire in western Europe)
prefecture - the district administered by a prefect (as in France or Japan or the Roman Empire)
Byzantine Empire, Eastern Roman Empire, Byzantium - a continuation of the Roman Empire in the Middle East after its division in 395
Western Empire, Western Roman Empire - the western part after the Roman Empire was divided in 395; it lasted only until 476
Africa - the second largest continent; located to the south of Europe and bordered to the west by the South Atlantic and to the east by the Indian Ocean
Asia - the largest continent with 60% of the earth's population; it is joined to Europe on the west to form Eurasia; it is the site of some of the world's earliest civilizations
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
Roman - an inhabitant of the ancient Roman Empire
Translations
Römisches Reich

Roman Empire

References in classic literature ?
And if the first disaster to the Roman Empire[*] should be examined, it will be found to have commenced only with the enlisting of the Goths; because from that time the vigour of the Roman Empire began to decline, and all that valour which had raised it passed away to others.
Count of the Holy Roman Empire, Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Brazen Crown, Perpetual Arch-Master of the Rosicrucian Masons of Mesopotamia; Attached (in Honorary Capacities) to Societies Musical, Societies Medical, Societies Philosophical, and Societies General Benevolent, throughout Europe; etc.
Even very clever people cannot tell the exact date at which the Roman Empire came to an end and the Greek or Byzantine Empire, as it is called, began.
They were sombre blues, opaque like a delicately carved bowl in lapis lazuli, and yet with a quivering lustre that suggested the palpitation of mysterious life; there were purples, horrible like raw and putrid flesh, and yet with a glowing, sensual passion that called up vague memories of the Roman Empire of Heliogabalus; there were reds, shrill like the berries of holly -- one thought of Christmas in England, and the snow, the good cheer, and the pleasure of children -- and yet by some magic softened till they had the swooning tenderness of a dove's breast; there were deep yellows that died with an unnatural passion into a green as fragrant as the spring and as pure as the sparkling water of a mountain brook.
Compared with the liberality and comfort of the ordinary life of the time, the order of the Roman Empire under the Antonines was local and limited.
I am so rich, I could have given bid for bid with the wealthiest Praetorians at the auction of the Roman empire (which was the world's); and yet I owe for the flesh in the tongue I brag with.
Locusta and Agrippina, living at the same time, were an exception, and proved the determination of providence to effect the entire ruin of the Roman empire, sullied by so many crimes.
Then he would pass through the land of the Almains and the great Roman Empire, and so to the country of the Huns and of the Lithuanian pagans, beyond which lies the great city of Constantine and the kingdom of the unclean followers of Mahmoud.
The process by which Britain became England was a part of the long agony which transformed the Roman Empire into modern Europe.
In the flourishing times of the Roman Empire, it was the ordinary station of the prefect of the eastern provinces; and many of the emperors of the queen city (among whom may be mentioned, especially, Verus and Valens) spent here the greater part of their time.
Silas Wegg, being on his road to the Roman Empire, approaches it by way of Clerkenwell.
In my opinion the Roman Catholic religion is not a faith at all, but simply a continuation of the Roman Empire, and everything is subordinated to this idea--beginning with faith.