gladiator

(redirected from Roman gladiators)
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Related to Roman gladiators: Spartacus

glad·i·a·tor

 (glăd′ē-ā′tər)
n.
1. A person, usually a professional combatant, a captive, or a slave, trained to entertain the public by engaging in mortal combat with another person or a wild animal in the ancient Roman arena.
2. A person engaged in a controversy or debate, especially in public; a disputant.
3. Sports A professional boxer.

[Middle English, from Latin gladiātor, from gladius, sword, of Celtic origin; akin to Old Irish claideb.]

glad′i·a·to′ri·al (-ə-tôr′ē-əl) adj.

gladiator

(ˈɡlædɪˌeɪtə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome and Etruria) a man trained to fight in arenas to provide entertainment
2. a person who supports and fights publicly for a cause
[C16: from Latin: swordsman, from gladius sword]

glad•i•a•tor

(ˈglæd iˌeɪ tər)

n.
1. (in ancient Rome) a man compelled to fight to the death in a public arena for the entertainment of spectators.
2. someone who engages in a fight or controversy.
3. a prizefighter.
[1535–45; < Latin gladiātor, derivative of gladi(us) sword]
glad`i•a•to′ri•al (-əˈtɔr i əl, -ˈtoʊr-) adj.

gladiator

, gladiate - The main Latin word for sword was gladius, from which came gladiator; gladiate is an adjective meaning sword-shaped.
See also related terms for sword.

gladiator

An armed fighter for arena contests. Up to 5000 pairs could perform in one spectacle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gladiator - (ancient Rome) a professional combatant or a captive who entertained the public by engaging in mortal combatgladiator - (ancient Rome) a professional combatant or a captive who entertained the public by engaging in mortal combat
capital of Italy, Eternal City, Italian capital, Rome, Roma - capital and largest city of Italy; on the Tiber; seat of the Roman Catholic Church; formerly the capital of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire
battler, belligerent, combatant, fighter, scrapper - someone who fights (or is fighting)
antiquity - the historic period preceding the Middle Ages in Europe
2.gladiator - a professional boxergladiator - a professional boxer      
boxer, pugilist - someone who fights with his fists for sport
featherweight - a professional boxer who weighs between 123 and 126 pounds
heavyweight - a professional boxer who weighs more than 190 pounds
cruiserweight, light heavyweight - a professional boxer who weighs between 169 and 175 pounds
lightweight - a professional boxer who weighs between 131 and 135 pounds
middleweight - a professional boxer who weighs between 155 and 160 pounds
welterweight - a professional boxer who weighs between 141 and 147 pounds
Translations
مُجالِد، مُصارِع
gladiátor
gladiator
gladiátor
skylmingaòræll
gladiatorius
gladiators
gladiátor

gladiator

[ˈglædɪeɪtəʳ] Ngladiador m

gladiator

[ˈglædieɪtər] ngladiateur m

gladiator

nGladiator m

gladiator

[ˈglædɪˌeɪtəʳ] ngladiatore m

gladiator

(ˈglӕdieitə) noun
in ancient Rome, a man trained to fight with other men or with animals for the amusement of spectators.
References in classic literature ?
I feel as if I were back in the days of the Roman gladiators.
His straight and perfect figure, muscled as the best of the ancient Roman gladiators must have been muscled, and yet with the soft and sinuous curves of a Greek god, told at a glance the wondrous combination of enormous strength with suppleness and speed.
The Tin Woodman was usually a peaceful man, but when occasion required he could fight as fiercely as a Roman gladiator.
Spoliarium,' depicting fallen Roman gladiators, and the silver medalist by Hidalgo, 'Christian Virgins Exposed to the Roman Populace,' were heralded by the Philippine expatriate community in Madrid led by Jose Rizal as allegories of the country's colonial condition but also proofs of Philippine genius flowering under Spanish tutelage.
It's no accident then that American society, long mobilized for permanent war, has evolved the most brutal competitive fighting sport since the Roman gladiators, MMA.
From diminishing ice to the peak of our London urban Shard, Crane has captured the chronology of change of our landscape, full of facts, imagination and archaeology Britain's waking has the underlying theme of climate warming, increased greening and the successive arrival of European farmers and Roman gladiators.
Expect Roman gladiators, cartoon characters, super heroes and even runners dressed entirely in animal suits to be spotted along the route as the day moulds itself into one huge sporting and social spectacle at the same time," they added.
The 80-minute show is set to feature live performances depicting a mock Viking invasion, jousting knights and Roman gladiators.
ROMAN gladiators strolled along the Llandudno Promenade on Tuesday, drawing a curious crowd.
Most Roman gladiators were slaves forced to fight for sport all over the Empire.
How many of the Roman gladiators who went to their deaths within its walls could have imagined it one day as a day trip for coach parties of tourists?