Tacitus

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Tac·i·tus

 (tăs′ĭ-təs), Publius Cornelius ad 55?-120?
Roman public official and historian whose two greatest works, Histories and Annals, concern the period from the death of Augustus (ad 14) to the death of Domitian (96).

Tacitus

(ˈtæsɪtəs)
n
(Biography) Publius Cornelius (ˈpʌblɪəs kɔːˈniːljəs). ?55–?120 ad, Roman historian and orator, famous as a prose stylist. His works include the Histories, dealing with the period 68–96, and the Annals, dealing with the period 14–68

Tac•i•tus

(ˈtæs ɪ təs)

n.
Publius Cornelius, A.D. c55–c120, Roman historian.
Tac`i•te′an (-ˈti ən) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Tacitus - Roman historian who wrote major works on the history of the Roman Empire (56-120)
Translations

Tacitus

[ˈtæsɪtəs] NTácito

Tacitus

[ˈtæsɪtəs] n (History, Literature) → Tacito
References in periodicals archive ?
Fifty years after the battle, Roman historian Tacitus wrote down Boudica's rousing speech to her followers: "But now it is not as a woman descended from noble ancestry, but as one of the people that I am avenging lost freedom, my scourged body, the outraged chastity of my daughters.
The Roman historian Tacitus wrote of the Emperor Galba (someone we never remember today) "OMNIUM CONSENSU CAPAX IMPERII, NISI IMPERASSET", which roughly translated says "Everyone thought he would be a good ruler if only he hadn't actually done it".
Where they make a desert, they call it peace," Kerry said, quoting the Roman historian Tacitus.
That is 50 years before Roman historian Tacitus mentions the city.
10) The other is included in the Annals composed by the Roman historian Tacitus at some time between 116 CE and 120 CE, perhaps even later.
Mentioned by the Roman historian Tacitus as one point in the Palatine pomerium, which according to legend was the original line ploughed by Romulus to mark Rome's boundaries, the Curiae Veteres were an important gathering place.
The Roman historian Tacitus gives us graphic accounts of the Silurian War, a quarter of a century-long guerrilla conflict.
A selection of classical works belonging to the Founding Fathers that helped shape their political thought during the early years of the American republic, including John Adams' personal copy of Plutarch's Lives, John Dickenson's personal copy of the works of Roman historian Tacitus, and John Quincy Adams' personal copy of Cicero's De Oratore.