Roman Legion

(redirected from Roman legionary)
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Noun1.Roman Legion - a division of from 3000 to 6000 men (including cavalry) in the Roman armyRoman Legion - a division of from 3000 to 6000 men (including cavalry) in the Roman army
legion, host - archaic terms for army
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References in periodicals archive ?
Brent works in Chester, which was a Roman legionary fortress and town called Deva that was home to the biggest known amphitheatre in Britain.
She's still learning." Brent works in Chester, which was a Roman legionary fortress and town called Deva that was home to the biggest known amphitheatre in Britain.
During the 1990s public inquiry into the Hinkley Point C nuclear station, I saw a poster showing a Roman legionary standing outside a nuclear plant and carrying the message "If the Romans had had nuclear power, we would still be guarding the waste".
The amphitheatre was built to serve the Roman legionary fortress of Isca nearly 2,000 years ago and its remains have been a well-known feature of the landscape ever since.
"The Roman Legionaries: Soldiers of Empire" by archaeologist, historian and leading aerospace journalist Simon Elliot is a concise, informative, and entertaining history of the Roman legionary covering their history from the age of Augustus through the heyday of the Roman Empire.
Norton dad Mick Crosby, 47, usually seen patrolling North Ormesby as a street warden, was dressed as a Roman legionary, left.
"When they stopped for a meal, they would soak it in water to eat A Roman legionary |on the march - looking
As part of Carnival day last year, the society held a parade down Prestatyn's high street featured a Norman warrior, and the first Roman Legionary to visit the town in 2000 years, all watched over by Edwardian ladies with lace umbrellas.
Roman Legionary AD 69-161 considers the Roman forces that changed during this period, when Italians were almost entirely replaced by local recruits from Germans to Africans and Syrians.
Also written at the death-throes of self-bloating romanticisim, but expressing itself in a totally different, twilight-denying way is Respighi's symphonic poem The Pines of Rome, the CBSO winds fizzing in its boisterous opening before more portentous matters take over, with a march-past of Roman legionary forces.
HE was a whiz as a military commander and managed to use elephants in a way that must have come as a shock to the average Roman legionary, but there's little evidence to suggest Hannibal was much good on a bike.
It is told by two protagonists, Trista, a Celtic girl warrior who possesses the gift of sight and Morcant, a Roman legionary with Celtic ancestry and the shapeshifter gene.