Roman mythology


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Related to Roman mythology: Greek mythology, Norse mythology
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Noun1.Roman mythology - the mythology of the ancient RomansRoman mythology - the mythology of the ancient Romans
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
Epona - (possibly Roman mythology) Celtic goddess of horses and mules and asses
Mors - (Roman mythology) Roman god of death; counterpart of Thanatos
Mars - (Roman mythology) Roman god of war and agriculture; father of Romulus and Remus; counterpart of Greek Ares
Rea Silvia, Rhea Silvia - (Roman mythology) a vestal virgin who became the mother by Mars of the twins Romulus and Remus
Romulus - (Roman mythology) founder of Rome; suckled with his twin brother Remus by a wolf after their parents (Mars and Rhea Silvia) abandoned them; Romulus killed Remus in an argument over the building of Rome
Remus - (Roman mythology) the twin brother of Romulus
Diana - (Roman mythology) virgin goddess of the hunt and the Moon; counterpart of Greek Artemis
Minerva - (Roman mythology) goddess of wisdom; counterpart of Greek Athena
Dido - (Roman mythology) a princess of Tyre who was the founder and queen of Carthage; Virgil tells of her suicide when she was abandoned by Aeneas
Saturn - (Roman mythology) god of agriculture and vegetation; counterpart of Greek Cronus; "Saturday is Saturn's Day"
Ceres - (Roman mythology) goddess of agriculture; counterpart of Greek Demeter
Amor, Cupid - (Roman mythology) god of love; counterpart of Greek Eros
Sol - (Roman mythology) ancient Roman god; personification of the sun; counterpart of Greek Helios
Vulcan - (Roman mythology) god of fire and metal working; counterpart of Greek Hephaestus
Mercury - (Roman mythology) messenger of Jupiter and god of commerce; counterpart of Greek Hermes
Janus - (Roman mythology) the Roman god of doorways and passages; is depicted with two faces on opposite sides of his head
Juno - (Roman mythology) queen of the Olympian gods who protected marriage; wife and sister of Jupiter; counterpart of Greek Hera
Vesta - (Roman mythology) goddess of the hearth and its fire whose flame was tended by vestal virgins; counterpart of Greek Hestia
Victoria - (Roman mythology) goddess of victory; counterpart of Greek Nike
Faunus - (Roman mythology) ancient rural deity; later considered a counterpart of Greek Pan
Neptune - (Roman mythology) god of the sea; counterpart of Greek Poseidon
Luna - (Roman mythology) the goddess of the Moon; counterpart of Greek Selene
Aurora - (Roman mythology) goddess of the dawn; counterpart of Greek Eos
Tellus - (Roman mythology) goddess of the earth; protector of marriage and fertility; identified with Greek Gaea
Fortuna - (Roman mythology) the goddess of fortune and good luck; counterpart of Greek Tyche
Jove, Jupiter - (Roman mythology) supreme god of Romans; counterpart of Greek Zeus
vestal virgin - (Roman mythology) one of the virgin priestesses consecrated to the Roman goddess Vesta and to maintaining the sacred fire in her temple
Ops - (Roman mythology) goddess of abundance and fertility; wife of Saturn; counterpart of Greek Rhea and Cybele of ancient Asia Minor
Silvanus, Sylvanus - (Roman mythology) god of woods and fields and flocks; Pan is the Greek counterpart
bacchant - (classical mythology) a priest or votary of Bacchus
bacchante - (classical mythology) a priestess or votary of Bacchus
References in classic literature ?
I read other books about that time, notably a small book on Grecian and Roman mythology, which I perused with such a passion for those pagan gods and goddesses that, if it had ever been a question of sacrificing to Diana, I do not really know whether I should have been able to refuse.
In Greek and Roman mythology, a Muse refers to any one of the goddesses, the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, who preside over the arts, stimulating creativity and inspiration.
According to Roman mythology, there was a time when Pluto - their God of the dead - kidnapped Proserpina and held her hostage in his underworld lair.
Ovid wrote of the creation and history of the world through stories with physical transformations from Greek and Roman mythology. There is the metamorphosis and transformation of Pygmalion's inanimate sculpture into a living being, or Narcissus into a beautiful flower.
The planet's name is derived from the Greek God Uranus, and is thus distinct from all other planetary names that have roots in not Greek, but Roman mythology.
It will have Native American mythology and classical Greek and Roman mythology, as well as cover Hindu traditions and Australian Aboriginal stories," Dr.
The rules of the International Astronomical Union require that the moons of Neptune are named after Greek and Roman mythology of the undersea world.
Who in Roman mythology was the father of Jupiter, Neptune and Pluto?
For us, when we inquire about the history of a place, we imagine that we will be taken back to Egyptian or Greek or Roman mythology and proceed from there to archaeological finds from the Stone Age and then to documented history, where we could start with the Romans (depending on the location of the place and whether it came into the ambit of the Roman Empire), and walk along cobbled roads and admire the ruins of amphitheatres, aqueducts, etc.
In Roman mythology, who was the goddess of the moon?
A staunch member of Methodist Church, MS Mathiba related the celebration to Janus of Roman mythology who she said looked simultaneously backward and forward.
In Roman mythology the twins were tossed into the River Tiber by their uncle Amulius.