Roman nose

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Roman nose

n.
A nose with a high prominent bridge.

Roman nose

n
(Anatomy) a nose having a high prominent bridge

Ro′man nose′


n.
a nose having a prominent upper part or bridge.
[1615–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Roman nose - a nose with a prominent slightly aquiline bridgeRoman nose - a nose with a prominent slightly aquiline bridge
nose, olfactory organ - the organ of smell and entrance to the respiratory tract; the prominent part of the face of man or other mammals; "he has a cold in the nose"
Translations

Roman nose

nnaso aquilino
References in classic literature ?
They are a fine race of men averaging six feet in height, lithe and active, with hawks' eyes and Roman noses. The latter feature is common to the Indians on the east side of the Rocky Mountains; those on the western side have generally straight or flat noses.
One can't help believing gentlemen with Roman noses, even if one meets them in omnibuses."
Wopsle, united to a Roman nose and a large shining bald forehead, had a deep voice which he was uncommonly proud of; indeed it was understood among his acquaintance that if you could only give him his head, he would read the clergyman into fits; he himself confessed that if the Church was "thrown open," meaning to competition, he would not despair of making his mark in it.
Blake, of the sort that are not to be triffled with-- the sort with the light complexion and the Roman nose. She felt the utmost contempt for Mr.
She had the proud, impetuous face that goes with reddish colouring, and a Roman nose, as it did in Marie Antoinette.
Here is the appearance of purchaser as supplied at the Arcade:-- looked like a military gentleman; tall, dark, and rather dressy; fine Roman nose (quite so), carefully trimmed moustache going grey (not at all); hair thin and thoughtfully distributed over the head like fiddlestrings, as if to make the most of it (pah!); dusted chair with handkerchief before sitting down on it, and had other oldmaidish ways (I should like to know what they are); tediously polite, but no talker; bored face; age forty-five if a day (a lie); was accompanied by an enormous yellow dog with sore eyes.
An operation which, taken in connexion with the bushy eyebrows and the Roman nose, suggested with some liveliness the idea of a hawk engaged upon the eyes of a tough little bird.