Romanesque


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Ro·man·esque

 (rō′mə-nĕsk′)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or being a style of European architecture containing both Roman and Byzantine elements, prevalent especially in the 11th and 12th centuries and characterized by massive walls, round arches, and relatively simple ornamentation.
2. Of, relating to, or being corresponding styles in painting and sculpture.
n.
A Romanesque style of architecture, painting, or sculpture.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Romanesque

(ˌrəʊməˈnɛsk)
adj
1. (Architecture) denoting, relating to, or having the style of architecture used in W and S Europe from the 9th to the 12th century, characterized by the rounded arch, the groin vault, massive-masonry wall construction, and a restrained use of mouldings. See also Norman16
2. (Art Terms) denoting or relating to a corresponding style in painting, sculpture, etc
[C18: Roman + -esque]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ro•man•esque

(ˌroʊ məˈnɛsk)

adj.
of or pertaining to the style of architecture prevailing in W and S Europe from the 9th through the 12th centuries, characterized by heavy masonry construction with narrow openings and the use of the round arch, the groin vault, and the barrel vault.
[1705–15; Roman + -esque; compare French romanesque romantic]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Romanesque - a style of architecture developed in Italy and western Europe between the Roman and the Gothic styles after 1000 ADRomanesque - a style of architecture developed in Italy and western Europe between the Roman and the Gothic styles after 1000 AD; characterized by round arches and vaults and by the substitution of piers for columns and profuse ornament and arcades
architectural style, style of architecture, type of architecture - architecture as a kind of art form
Norman architecture - a Romanesque style first appearing in Normandy around 950 AD and used in Britain from the Norman Conquest until the 12th century
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
románský
romansk
romaaninen
romanski
ロマネスク様式の
로마네스크 양식의
romansk
có kiểu kiến trúc La Mã

Romanesque

[ˌrəʊməˈnesk] ADJ (Archit) → románico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Romanesque

[ˌrəʊməˈnɛsk] adjroman(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Romanesque

adjromanisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Romanesque

[ˌrəʊməˈnɛsk] adj (Archit) → romanico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

Romanesque

طِرَازٌ رومانيّ románský romansk romanisch ρομανικός románico romaaninen romanesque romanski romanico ロマネスク様式の 로마네스크 양식의 romaans romansk romański românico романский romansk ซึ่งเป็นสถาปัตยกรรมที่แพร่ในยุโรปตะวันตกตั้งแต่ศตวรรษที่ ๙ ถึง ๑๒ Romanesk có kiểu kiến trúc La Mã 罗马式
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
It is no longer a Romanesque church; nor is it a Gothic church.
The Saxon architect completed the erection of the first pillars of the nave, when the pointed arch, which dates from the Crusade, arrived and placed itself as a conqueror upon the large Romanesque capitals which should support only round arches.
However, these edifices of the transition from the Romanesque to the Gothic, are no less precious for study than the pure types.
Not to consider here anything except the Christian architecture of Europe, that younger sister of the great masonries of the Orient, it appears to the eyes as an immense formation divided into three well-defined zones, which are superposed, the one upon the other: the Romanesque zone*, the Gothic zone, the zone of the Renaissance, which we would gladly call the Greco-Roman zone.
The shape of his head was perfectly Western, perfectly and typically Romanesque. The carriage of his body must have been inherited from his mother, of whom it was said that no more graceful woman ever walked.
Looked at in one way each breadth stands alone, the bloated curves and flourishes--a kind of "debased Romanesque" with delirium tremens--go waddling up and down in isolated columns of fatuity.
It was in the interwar years of the 20th Century that the specific qualities of the Romanesque began to be differentiated from the Gothic, not simply on stylistic grounds, but with regard to a cluster of other, highly emotive and indeed political, aspects.
Of interest to scholars and graduate students of medieval art history, this collection of nine essays presents new approaches and interpretations to Romanesque sculpture, written by well-known scholars in the field.
Son etude nous entraine ainsi non seulement au travers des etapes de transformation sur le plan politique et historique, mais aussi, et c'est ce qui nous parait le plus important pour la problematique generale de l'ouvrage, sur la litterarisation ou l'heroisation romanesque de la grisette.
I HAVE no problem with the Romanesque frontage of the bus station.
The Romanesque Revival: Religion, Politics, and Transnational Exchange.
As a native of the town I remember it as probably the finest open air swimming pool in South Wales, surrounded by cubicles with classical Romanesque roofing, but it is now in a sad state of dereliction.