Romulus


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Rom·u·lus

 (rŏm′yə-ləs)
n. Roman Mythology
The son of Mars and eponymous founder of Rome who, with his twin brother, Remus, was reared and suckled by a wolf.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Romulus

(ˈrɒmjʊləs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Roman myth the founder of Rome, suckled with his twin brother Remus by a she-wolf after they were abandoned in infancy. Their parents were Rhea Silvia and Mars. Romulus later killed Remus in an argument over the new city
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Rom•u•lus

(ˈrɒm yə ləs)

n.
the legendary founder of Rome and its first king: a son of Mars, he and his twin brother (Remus) were abandoned as infants and suckled by a wolf.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Romulus - (Roman mythology) founder of RomeRomulus - (Roman mythology) founder of Rome; suckled with his twin brother Remus by a wolf after their parents (Mars and Rhea Silvia) abandoned them; Romulus killed Remus in an argument over the building of Rome
Roman mythology - the mythology of the ancient Romans
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Romulus

[ˈrɒmjʊləs] NRómulo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Romulus

[ˈrɒmjʊləs] nRomolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
But to come to those who, by their own ability and not through fortune, have risen to be princes, I say that Moses, Cyrus, Romulus, Theseus, and such like are the most excellent examples.
It was necessary that Romulus should not remain in Alba, and that he should be abandoned at his birth, in order that he should become King of Rome and founder of the fatherland.
Romulus was here before he built Rome, and thought something of founding a city on this spot, but gave up the idea.
If Romulus and Remus could wait, Josiah Bounderby can wait.
The foundation of the original government of Rome was laid by Romulus, and the work completed by two of his elective successors, Numa and Tullius Hostilius.
A Gascon, he exceeded in ill-luck all the gasconnades of France and Navarre; Raoul had a hundred times heard Job and D'Artagnan named together, as the twins Romulus and Remus.
Romulus, after his death (as they report or feign), sent a present to the Romans, that above all, they should intend arms; and then they should prove the greatest empire of the world.
Induced by these feelings, I was of course led to admire peaceable lawgivers, Numa, Solon, and Lycurgus, in preference to Romulus and Theseus.
By Romulus, he is all soul, I think; He hath no flesh, and spirit cannot be gyved; Then we have vanquished nothing; he is free, And Martius walks now in captivity."
Cards of breakfast- invitation were sent out to half the English in the city of Romulus; the other half made arrangements to be under arms, as criticising volunteers, at various outer points of the solemnity.
The story of Romulus and Remus being suckled by a wolf is not a meaningless fable.
The retreat of Rocca Bianca was at the top of a small mountain, which no doubt in former days had been a volcano -- an extinct volcano before the days when Remus and Romulus had deserted Alba to come and found the city of Rome.