rookery

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rook·er·y

 (ro͝ok′ə-rē)
n. pl. rook·er·ies
1.
a. A place where large numbers of rooks or certain seabirds or marine animals, such as penguins or seals, nest or breed.
b. A colony of such animals.
2. Informal A crowded and dilapidated tenement or area.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rookery

(ˈrʊkərɪ)
n, pl -eries
1. (Zoology) a group of nesting rooks
2. (Zoology) a clump of trees containing rooks' nests
3. (Zoology)
a. a breeding ground or communal living area of certain other species of gregarious birds or mammals, esp penguins or seals
b. a colony of any such creatures
4. archaic an overcrowded slum tenement building or area of housing
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rook•er•y

(ˈrʊk ə ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. a colony or breeding place of rooks or other gregarious creatures, as penguins or seals.
2. any teeming, overcrowded place.
[1715–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

rook·er·y

(ro͝ok′ə-rē)
A place where certain birds or animals, such as crows, penguins, and seals, gather to breed.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rookery

a breeding or nesting place of rooks or of any gregarious bird or animal.
See also: Animals, Birds
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Rookery

 a collection of rooks’ nests; the breeding place or large colony of sea birds or other marine mammals; hence, the birds themselves, as herons or penguins; a cluster of dilapidated buildings. See also building.
Examples: rookery of albatross, 1838; of buildings; of crows, 1822; of herons; of penguins, 1840; of prostitutes, 1851; of rooks, 1725; of sea bears, 1881; of sea elephants, 1860; of seals, 1847; of volcanoes.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rookery - a breeding ground for gregarious birds (such as rooks)rookery - a breeding ground for gregarious birds (such as rooks)
breeding ground - a place where animals breed
heronry - a breeding ground for herons; a heron rookery
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

rookery

[ˈrʊkərɪ] Ncolonia f de grajos
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

rookery

nKolonie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

rookery

[ˈrʊkərɪ] ncolonia di corvi
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The residences, raised high upon their metal columns, resembled huge rookeries, while the uprights themselves presented the appearance of steel tree trunks.
Coming from no man knew where in the illimitable Pacific, it was travelling north on its annual migration to the rookeries of Bering Sea.
CLEVELAND'S tree-top rookeries appear to be moving into top gear.
In addition to the Baker's Lake rookery, the Forest Preserves has rookeries at Busse Woods, McGinnis Slough, Powderhorn Lake and other preserves.
This feather's popularity meant that all of the more accessible egret rookeries had long been depleted.
Specifically, the reptiles in rookeries had sticks on their snouts during and after the nest-building season.
ROOKERIES are getting very busy and raucous this time of year as birds jostle for roosts and steal neighbours' twigs to add to their own nests.
There are currently 13 major rookeries (>50 pups): five in southeastern Alaska, three in British Columbia, two in Oregon, and three in California.
This, despite the fact that, to reach their rookeries, the penguins must cross fields of unexploded mines left behind by combatants.
No matter how well designed initially, airports have the habit of attracting as Pearman puts it 'a circlet of ill-designed shanties and rookeries' around their edge or even within the terminal buildings themselves.
The park will be home to one of the largest Magellan penguin rookeries in the world, along with sea lions, pumas and some 50 bird species.