root system

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root system

n.
1. All of the roots of a plant.
2. The arrangement of the roots of a plant: a branched root system.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.root system - a developed system of rootsroot system - a developed system of roots    
system, scheme - a group of independent but interrelated elements comprising a unified whole; "a vast system of production and distribution and consumption keep the country going"
root - (botany) the usually underground organ that lacks buds or leaves or nodes; absorbs water and mineral salts; usually it anchors the plant to the ground
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydration will support the root systems of your trees, shrubs and perennials as winter comes our way.
Introducing and studying the class of groups graded by root systems, Ershov, Jaikin-Zapirain, and Kassabov prove that if phi is an irreducible classical root system of rank two or more, and G is a group graded by phi, then under certain natural condition on the grading, the union of the root subgroups is a Kazhdan subset of G.
For example, clay soils retain a great amount of water, but less than 50 per cent of the water is released to the root systems," Dr Kush said.
Plants located close to streets and drives where deicing materials are spread will often receive excessive amounts around their root systems.
Using this index, branching of root systems is possible to describe as a herringbone (theoretical maximum index value 1) or dichotomous type (index value approaches zero), or between these two extremes, and thus relate growth strategy of root system--i.
This parameter had four categories: "optimum" indicated a well-structured root system with no flexibility and the presence of new roots; "good" was assigned to root systems that had good structure but some flexibility, which would require greater care in planting to avoid harming the field performance; and "poor" was assigned to root systems that had no aggregated substrate or new roots and was considered unfit for planting in the field.
BaskiAaAaAeA~as also recommended that trees with needle-like foliage, spheric canopy-structure, deep root systems, and strong wood should be replanted in areas that are typhoon-prone or high in elevation.
They don't need a lot of their root systems at the moment so you won't be doing any major damage if you lose some of the roots in the process.
For further background on root systems, see [Hum90].
Root systems may be deformed, and underground organs such as potato tubers and carrot tap roots may be damaged and become nmarketable (Roberts, 1987; Sikora and Fernandez, 1990).
One of the obvious reasons is that root systems are hard to study in a non-destructive manner, since instruments that allow studying a root system in sin do not exist, and destructive methods require ample labor when conducted in a high-throughput fashion.
Some varieties are more like meadow fescue, which has well developed root systems, and others more like ryegrass, which is easy to establish and grows quickly.