Rosa


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Related to Rosa: Ross

Ro·sa

 (rō′zä), Monte
A mountain, 4,634 m (15,203 ft) high, in the Pennine Alps on the Swiss-Italian border. It is the highest elevation in Switzerland.

Rosa

(ˈrəʊzə; Italian ˈrɔːza)
n
(Placename) a mountain between Italy and Switzerland: the highest in the Pennine Alps. Height: 4634 m (15 204 ft)

Rosa

(Italian ˈrɔːza)
n
(Biography) Salvator (ˈsalvatɔr). 1615–73, Italian artist, noted esp for his romantic landscapes

Ro•sa

(ˈroʊ zə)

n.
Mon•te (ˈmɒn ti, -teɪ) a mountain between Switzerland and Italy, in the Pennine Alps: second highest peak of the Alps. 15,217 ft. (4638 m).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Rosa - large genus of erect or climbing prickly shrubs including rosesRosa - large genus of erect or climbing prickly shrubs including roses
rosid dicot genus - a genus of dicotyledonous plants
family Rosaceae, Rosaceae, rose family - a large family of dicotyledonous plants of order Rosales; have alternate leaves and five-petaled flowers with numerous stamens
rose, rosebush - any of many shrubs of the genus Rosa that bear roses
References in classic literature ?
The pet pupil of the Nuns' House is Miss Rosa Bud, of course called Rosebud; wonderfully pretty, wonderfully childish, wonderfully whimsical.
The last new maid, who has never seen the young gentleman Miss Rosa is engaged to, and who is making his acquaintance between the hinges of the open door, left open for the purpose, stumbles guiltily down the kitchen stairs, as a charming little apparition, with its face concealed by a little silk apron thrown over its head, glides into the parlour.
'Once for all, Rosa, will you uncover that ridiculous little head of yours and give me a welcome?'
'De-lightfully!' cries Rosa, in a quite spontaneous manner, and without the least pretence of reserve.
O dear yes!' cries Rosa, laughing with great enjoyment.
'Because I was so tired of you,' returns Rosa. But she quickly adds, and pleadingly too, seeing displeasure in his face: 'Dear Eddy, you were just as tired of me, you know.'
"Hush, my father," said Rosa, "you are unjust to this gentleman, whom I found endeavouring to give you his aid."
"Do you hear, Rosa?" said Gryphus, "the prisoner is going to set my arm, that's a saving; come, assist me to get up, I feel as heavy as lead."
Rosa lent the sufferer her shoulder; he put his unhurt arm around her neck, and making an effort, got on his legs, whilst Cornelius, to save him a walk, pushed a chair towards him.
Rosa went down, and immediately after returned with two staves of a small barrel and a large roll of linen bandage.
Rosa pushed the table, Cornelius placed the broken arm on it so as to make it flat, and with perfect skill set the bone, adjusted the splinters, and fastened the bandages.
But, instead of acting up to the doctor's prescription, Rosa, after having satisfied herself that her father was still unconscious, approached Cornelius and said, --