Rosinante


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Related to Rosinante: Sancho Panza

Rosinante

(ˌrɒzɪˈnæntɪ)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a worn-out emaciated old horse
[C18: from Spanish, the name of Don Quixote's horse, from rocin old horse]
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References in classic literature ?
And this feeling had been more painfully perceived by young D'Artagnan--for so was the Don Quixote of this second Rosinante named--from his not being able to conceal from himself the ridiculous appearance that such a steed gave him, good horseman as he was.
In diesem Fall sind sie gleichzeitig das Pferd von Don Quixote, Rosinante, und der Esel von Sancho Pansa.
17) DOS PASSOS, John: Rosinante to the Road Again, NY, George H.
It has been replaced by a steel horse, which looked like Rosinante, the one devoted to Don Quixote
Around 50 years of age, having changed his name and travelling with Rosinante, he leaves his Castilian village and wanders through the La Mancha territory, until he is dubbed a knight at an inn which he takes to be a castle.
Pegasus & Rosinante presents a selection of German poems and essays translated into English.
A nonbeliever might picture here Don Quixote, with his broken-down horse, Rosinante.
Mas interes tiene la que escribe John Dos Passos, que por aquellas fechas acababa de publicar Rosinante on the Road Again.
In his first Spanish book, Rosinante to the Road Again (1922), Telemachus and his bawdy companion, Lyaeus, ramble along Spanish roads in search of "the gesture", the essence of Spanish life that the Dos Passos persona hoped to emulate in words.
I remain one of those who have learned that windmills are not giants and monsters and who, all the same, cannot see Rosinante saddled up without itching for another ride.
Originally conceived as a comic satire against the chivalric romances then in literary vogue, the novel describes realistically what befalls an elderly knight who, his head bemused by reading romances, sets out on his old horse Rosinante, with his pragmatic squire Sancho Panza, to seek adventure.
Meanwhile, Merce at seventy-five, his ears possibly stopped up by the sound of that rightful public approbation due an artist who has served his community manfully and well, battles on like a trusty but iconoclastic Don Quixote on a spindly Rosinante.