Gatling gun

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Gatling gun

n.
A machine gun having a cluster of barrels that are fired in sequence as the cluster is rotated.

[After Richard Jordan Gatling.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Gatling gun

(ˈɡætlɪŋ)
n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) (sometimes not capital) a hand-cranked automatic machine gun equipped with a rotating cluster of barrels that are fired in succession using brass cartridges
[C19: named after R. J. Gatling (1818–1903), its US inventor]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Gat′ling gun`

(ˈgæt lɪŋ)
n.
an early type of machine gun consisting of a cluster of barrels around an axis that is rotated by a hand crank, with each barrel fired once during each rotation.
[1860–65, Amer.; after R. J. Gatling (1818–1903), U.S. inventor]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gatling gun - an early form of machine gun having several barrels that fire in sequence as they are rotatedGatling gun - an early form of machine gun having several barrels that fire in sequence as they are rotated
machine gun - a rapidly firing automatic gun (often mounted)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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