Roubiliac


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Roubiliac

(rubijak) or

Roubillac

n
(Biography) Louis-François (lwifrɑ̃swa). ?1695–1762, French sculptor: lived chiefly in England: his sculptures include the statue of Handel in Vauxhall Gardens (1737)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Marble Index: Roubiliac and Sculptural Portraiture in Eighteenth-Century Britain
The Birmingham MP also has a painting of William Shakespeare by Louis-Franois Roubiliac, a French artist best known for his sculpture, as well as a portrait by William Hoare of the 18th century Whig Prime Minister William Pitt, known as Pitt the Elder.
The image of Shakespeare is typically eighteenth-century as re-imagined by the sculptors Rysbrack, Scheemakers, Cheere, Roubiliac and Banks, between 1735 and 1790.
Considered one of the best private collections in the world, this small museum contains works from Rembrandt, Titian, Poussin and Roubiliac.
17) The design for the middle window was based on a statue created about 1745 by London-based French sculptor, Louis Francois Roubiliac (1702-1762).
3: "You may talk of your Venus of Medicis, your Dianas, your Nymphs, and Galateas; but if Praxiteles, and Roubiliac, and Wilton, were to lay their heads together, in order to make a complete pattern of beauty, they would hardly reach her model of perfection" (28).
Garrick and his Jubilee is an entertaining topic and Dobson conveys this, writing well of the Roubiliac statue of Shakespeare; but there is some sense of strain in labouring its symbolic portent.
Roubiliac gives a heroic view of the composer gazing into the heavens for inspiration.
The exhibition, 'Fame and Friendship: Pope, Roubiliac and the Portrait Bust', which opens this month at Waddesdon Manor (18 June-26 October), brings together eight versions by the sculptor Louis Francois Roubiliac of the poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744; see Contents, p.
His son, who assumed the name Nightingale under the will of a rich uncle, married Lady Elizabeth Shirley, daughter of the second Earl Ferrers--the woman immortalised in a dramatic tomb by Louis-Francois Roubiliac in Westminster Abbey.
We might here simply note that Roubiliac and Rysbrack are both recorded as having made self-portraits; that self-portrait sculptures by Giambologna, William Rush and Rodin exist; and that, in our own time in a great wave of self-portraiture, in addition to the three-dimensional self-portraits Hall includes in his final chapter, there are notable works by artists such as Marc Quinn--one version of Self, made from his own frozen blood, is in the National Portrait Gallery--and Ron Mueck, who began his career as a special effects artist.