Roubiliac


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Roubiliac

(rubijak) or

Roubillac

n
(Biography) Louis-François (lwifrɑ̃swa). ?1695–1762, French sculptor: lived chiefly in England: his sculptures include the statue of Handel in Vauxhall Gardens (1737)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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There is a particularly breathless effect in the attempt to cover the history of the oratorio genre and thirty years of Handel's career in the seven text pages of Chapter 2; the compression of the descriptions of Roubiliac's images of Handel (p.
Hence Sullivan quotes the entrepreneur and theatre manager Benjamin Victor writing of van Nost in 1756 that he was 'a greater master than Risbriac [sic], or Scheemaker [sic]; I will only except Roubiliac.'
The Birmingham MP also has a painting of William Shakespeare by Louis-Franois Roubiliac, a French artist best known for his sculpture, as well as a portrait by William Hoare of the 18th century Whig Prime Minister William Pitt, known as Pitt the Elder.
Spanning over 2,000 years, the works range from 16th- and 17th-century Italian bronzes and important 16th-century German wood sculptures to Roubiliac's great terracotta bust of Alexander Pope (c.1738) and bronzes by Degas and Rodin.
Louis-Franois Roubiliac's terracotta bust of poet Alexander Pope (c 1738) is one stand out exhibit, as is Grande Arabesque, Third Time - a ballet dancer cast in bronze from a wax model found in Degas's studio after his death.
The image of Shakespeare is typically eighteenth-century as re-imagined by the sculptors Rysbrack, Scheemakers, Cheere, Roubiliac and Banks, between 1735 and 1790.
Considered one of the best private collections in the world, this small museum contains works from Rembrandt, Titian, Poussin and Roubiliac. Many of the best 18th Century French paintings and furniture can be seen.
(17) The design for the middle window was based on a statue created about 1745 by London-based French sculptor, Louis Francois Roubiliac (1702-1762).
3: "You may talk of your Venus of Medicis, your Dianas, your Nymphs, and Galateas; but if Praxiteles, and Roubiliac, and Wilton, were to lay their heads together, in order to make a complete pattern of beauty, they would hardly reach her model of perfection" (28).
(47) The popularity of this danse macabre iconography in tomb sculpture continued well after the sixteenth century and culminated in Roubiliac's 1761 monument to Lady Elizabeth Nightingale at Westminster Abbey.
Garrick and his Jubilee is an entertaining topic and Dobson conveys this, writing well of the Roubiliac statue of Shakespeare; but there is some sense of strain in labouring its symbolic portent.