Rudolf Virchow


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Rudolf Virchow: Anton van Leeuwenhoek, Theodor Schwann
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Rudolf Virchow - German pathologist who recognized that all cells come from cells by binary fission and who emphasized cellular abnormalities in disease (1821-1902)Rudolf Virchow - German pathologist who recognized that all cells come from cells by binary fission and who emphasized cellular abnormalities in disease (1821-1902)
References in periodicals archive ?
It wasn't until the latter half of the 19th century that Rudolf Virchow described the workings of cellular pathology and became the founder of contemporary pathology practice and the dissemination of the germ theory of disease.
In 1853, he habilitated as Privatdozent (adjunct professor) for special pathology and therapeutics and in 1857 was appointed Professor Extraordinarius of Pathologic Anatomy in Wurzberg, a position formerly held by Rudolf Virchow (2, 3).
In this, I bring in the tradition of social medicine, whose early exponent, Rudolf Virchow, once said that 'doctors are the natural attorneys of the poor.' Is not malasakit(empathy) the logical and moral response to our intimacy with sakit (pain and suffering)?
The phenomenon was first described by Rudolf Virchow in 1865.
Stasis, local trauma to the vessel wall and hypercoagulability are the conditions that predispose to the development of venous thrombosis as postulated by Rudolf Virchow. The risk of each of these increases during pregnancy.
In Rudolf Virchow's (11) famous aphorism 'medicine is a social science, and politics nothing else but medicine on a large scale'.
Rudolf Virchow (18211902) is credited with being the Father' of Cellular pathology - the phrase omnis cellula e cellula" (every cell originates from another existing cell like it) is attributed to Virchow.
Rudolf Virchow, 1867 (known for his advancement of public health among many other achievements).
The date of World Thrombosis Day, October 13, was chosen as it is the birthday of Rudolf Virchow, the German physician and pathologist who first coined the term “thrombosis” and made crucial advances in our understanding of it.
It might suffice, to name just one example, to take a look at the enthusiasm of late-nineteenth-century medicine, expressed in the writings of men like Rudolf Virchow or Robert Koch, to find an optimistic merging of modernity and the vision of a life after disease.