Rum Rebellion


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Rum Rebellion

n
(Historical Terms) Austral the deposition of Governor William Bligh in 1808 by officers of the New South Wales Corps, caused by his interference in their trading activities, esp in the trafficking of rum
References in periodicals archive ?
Lesser-known historical figures like the Mughal emperor Babur and Australia's Rum Rebellion leader George Johnston are drawn in living colour, while Forsyth dispels some of the myths surrounding medieval merry-making and even Jesus' position on water versus wine.
Ironically, King was replaced by a man who already had a bad record with mutineers: the infamous Captain Bligh of the Bounty would become Governor Bligh of the Rum Rebellion.
The Rum Rebellion began when a group of state constables seized wine at the home/grocery store of John Scalcucci, who lived with his brothers in Virgil Location, a mining camp.
GUILE, Melanie Eyre's Expedition Across the Nullarbor ISBN 9781420293531 SC1S 1546041; Captain Bligh and the Rum Rebellion ISBN 9781420293524 SCIS 1546469; Mary MacKillop's Path to Sainthood ISBN 9781420293494 SCIS 1525520 32pp $31.
He describes rioting during the nineteenth century, including the Rum Rebellion and unrest during industrial disputes, such as the Maritime Strike of 1890; military and civil mutinies from 1885 to 1970 such as the New Zealand naval mutiny of 1947; and riots and assassinations and challenges to authority, including race and industrial riots, attacks on parliament, and terrorism.
Evatt, Rum Rebellion A Study of the Overthrow of Governor Bligh by John Macarthur and the New South Wales Corps, Australian Classics edition, London, 1978, pp.
In which country did the so-called Rum Rebellion of 1808 take place?
Events of the Rum Rebellion and the Eureka Rebellion are highlighted.
Evatt's Rum Rebellion, (4) to argue that the contributions of the Corps to the development of the colony far outweighed any profits made from their trading activities, which were deemed to be expected and quite honourable.
His publications include The King and His Dominion Governors (1936) and Rum Rebellion (1938).
Ritchie documents his rise through the colony's medical establishment, collecting land grant s as he went, against the background of the New South Wales Corps's twenty year period of domination of the colony, culminating in the Rum Rebellion of 1808, in which D'Arcy was a key figure.