Kirundi

(redirected from Rundi)
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Ki·run·di

 (kē-ro͞on′dē, -ro͝on′-)
n.
A Bantu language of Burundi, closely related to Kinyarwanda and an official language of Burundi.

Kirundi

(kɪˈrʊndɪ)
n
(Languages) the official language of Burundi, belonging to the Bantu group of the Niger-Congo family and closely related to Rwanda
References in periodicals archive ?
Minister for Utilities Dato Sri Dr Stephen Rundi anak Utom and Assistant Minister of Rural Electrification Dr Abdul Rahman Junaidi joined Sarawak Energys senior management team at an event to mark the addition of two new high-performance mobile generator sets to the corporations fleet at Menara Sarawak Energy today.
For a verse by Abu-I-Baqa Al Rundi that speaks about not letting life's luxuries deceive you, he has used the simplicity of the Ruqu'a style; and he turned to the exquisite, decorative Shekasta style to write the words of Elia Abu Madi that urge people to appreciate the beauty of life and see the beauty in everything.
The EAC, which includes Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda and Bu- rundi, was established to strengthen economic, political, social and cul- tural integration in order to improve the quality of life of people in East Africa.
Other conflicts or disputes on which Dlamini-Zuma has been much criticised are the crises in DRC and Bu- rundi.
A 40- feet high statue of the Lankan king was installed at Ravan Rundi in Khanpur area of the district a few years ago.
Ku rundi ruhande, nagaragaje ko ibikorwa biteza imbere indimi nyafurika bitagomba kugarukira ku gusigasira umurage w'indimi n'umuco cyangwa se ku kuzifasha kugira uruhare mu busabane n'imibanire y'abantu bya buri munsi gusa.
But when the Germans lost the First World War, they lost their colonies as well--in Africa they lost Togo, Kamerun, Tanganyika, Rundi and Ulundi (or Rwanda and Burundi), and Namibia.
This issue of the Journal includes an article by Rundi who explored healthcare-seeking behaviour with regard to TB among the people of Sabah in East Malaysia and the impact of TB on patients and their families (15).
Lullabies are also documented by Finnegan (1992) as providing an indirect means of critical expression among the Nyoro of Uganda, the Dogon, the Rundi and the Kamba and by Kunene in the 1970s in South Africa.