tap water

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tap water

n.
Water drawn directly from a tap or faucet.

tap water

n
water drawn off through taps from pipes in a house, as distinguished from distilled water, mineral water, etc

tap′ wa`ter


n.
water obtained via a plumbing system directly from a faucet or tap.
[1880–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tap water - water directly from the spigottap water - water directly from the spigot  
H2O, water - binary compound that occurs at room temperature as a clear colorless odorless tasteless liquid; freezes into ice below 0 degrees centigrade and boils above 100 degrees centigrade; widely used as a solvent
Translations
References in classic literature ?
And yet how could there be running water in the bowels of the earth?
In the long silence there was born upon Bradley's ears a faint, monotonous sound as of running water.
He found at the foot of a large walnut-tree a fountain of clear and running water.
Already they were busy with returning people; in places even there were shops open, and I saw a drinking fountain running water.
A favourite trick of his was to lose his trail in running water and then lie quietly in a near-by thicket while their baffled cries arose around him.
The running water and bath in the house were given up for piping to the barn, and stanchions--then novelties in southeastern Kansas.
The "rotting" was the most humiliating part of the process which followed, though, in our case, this was done in clear running water, and the "crackling" the most uncomfortable.
He walked for miles, around knolls, over ridges and through canyons, and finally covered the trail in the running water of a creek-bed.
But very wrongly, as I was soon to see; for I had not been half an hour at the inn (standing in the door most of the time, to ease my eyes from the peat smoke) when a thunderstorm came close by, the springs broke in a little hill on which the inn stood, and one end of the house became a running water.
The view would resemble that of a great lake, if it were not for the linear-shaped islets, which alone give the idea of running water.
Guarding themselves by the sound of running water, they set out for the river, and by slipping and sliding contrived to get down to its bank.
At sound of the running water the dogs began whimpering and yelping and moaning.