Rupert's Land


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Related to Rupert's Land: York Factory, Red River Colony

Rupert's Land

n
(Placename) (formerly, in Canada) the territories granted by Charles II to the Hudson's Bay Company in 1670 and ceded to the Canadian Government in 1870, comprising all the land watered by rivers flowing into Hudson Bay
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the Diocese of Rupert's Land, parishes are working to end hunger with the support of the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.
Brown, An Ethnohistorian in Rupert's Land; Unfinished Conversations.
On a similar vein, Rupert's Land was the Hudson's Bay drainage basin, an area of land established under the 1670 Hudson's Bay Charter.
The first stretches from the company's establishment as a chartered trading entity over "Rupert's Land" in 1670 through periods featuring French aggression, mounting scrutiny in Britain over its monopoly powers, and competition from the North West Company until the merger of the two companies in 1821.
Civilizing the wilderness; culture and nature in pre-confederation Canada and Rupert's land.
Caron and Boutet's theory of the case was based on facts and events that took place before the admission of Rupert's Land and the North-West Territories (82) into Canada and included the Royal Proclamation of 1869.
CIVILIZING THE WILDERNESS: CULTURE AND NATURE IN PRE-CONFEDERATION CANADA AND RUPERT'S LAND. By A.A.
John "who died about 12 years ago" (a quote from Sophia Rupert's land petition dated 1850, therefore he died circa 1838), is the father of Jerome Rupert of Sidney Township.
One such example notes the significance of Canada's eastern territories (Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and Rupert's Land) in the multi-national Treaty of Utrecht (26).
In that judgment, the Provincial Court stated that the Rupert's Land and North-Western Territory Order (an integral part of the Constitution of Canada, as defined by the Constitution Act, 1982) guaranteed the official status of the French language in Alberta.
Aunger claims that he has discovered that the official status of French dates from 1835 in Rupert's Land and the North-Western Territory, and that that status was carried over into Confederation in 1870 through section 23 of The Manitoba Act, 1870 (3) when these lands were acquired by Canada.
They knew about the transfer of Rupert's Land to the Dominion of Canada, and that the Canadian government had sent troops to the Red River Settlement to intimidate the Metis to ensure the orderly transfer of jurisdiction.