Rushdie


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Rush·die

 (rŭsh′dē), Salman Born 1947.
Indian-born British writer forced into hiding when his novel The Satanic Verses (1988) led the Iranian Ayatollah Khomeini to demand his execution. His other works include Midnight's Children (1981), which won the Booker Prize, and The Moor's Last Sigh (1995).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Rushdie

(ˈrʊʃðɪ)
n
(Biography) Sir (Ahmed) Salman (sʌlˈmɑːn). born 1947, British writer, born in India, whose novels include Midnight's Children (1981), which won the Booker prize, Shame (1983), The Ground Beneath Her Feet (1998), and Shalimar the Clown (2005). His novel The Satanic Verses (1988) was regarded as blasphemous by many Muslims and he was forced into hiding (1989) when the Ayatollah Khomeini called for his death; knighted in 2007
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Rushdie - British writer of novels who was born in IndiaRushdie - British writer of novels who was born in India; one of his novels is regarded as blasphemous by Muslims and a fatwa was issued condemning him to death (born in 1947)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Evoking that sense of universality becomes more difficult when you're telling a story that's an open homage to one of the most famous and influential works of literature in human history, but in his insightful and wickedly funny way, Salman Rushdie pulls it off with Quichotte (Random House, $28, 9780593132982, audio/eBook available).
Using carefully argued examples, Mishra addresses Rushdie's location within an essentially English-European sensibility and a contradictory orientalism that, in the end, especially in his reading of Islam, also connects him with earlier European colonial and orientalist writers.
SATANIC Verses author Salman Rushdie claims he was "groped" and "pawed" by Margaret Thatcher.
MARGARET Thatcher "groped" author Salman Rushdie, he claims.
Valentine's Day was the 30th anniversary of Ayatollah Khomeini's "death fatva" issued against author Salman Rushdie. Although most Iranian officials have preferred to forget all about it, Supreme Leader Ali Khamenehi this year surprisingly chose to use the anniversary to re-authorize the death sentence.
On this day in history in 1989 Ayatollah Khomeini, Iran's supreme leader, issued a fatwa against the author Salman Rushdie and offered a reward of $3 million to anyone who killed him.
Salman Rushdie. Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Salman Rushdie, the author of the blasphemous book 'The Satanic Verses', called off a scheduled event at Frankfurt International Book Fair as Muslim pressures against his appearance grew after an Iran-led boycott of the book event.
While Rushdie creates an almost flawless superstructure, he fails to provide the novel a soul
Some of Rushdie's most interesting characters are translators, which allows Rushdie to use acts of translation as catalysts for moments of crisis.
Playing Hide and Seek with Names and Selves in Salman Rushdie's Joseph Anton, A Memoir
Having recently read The Satanic Verses for the first time, I was intrigued to read about Rushdie's experience in the aftermath of the publication of one of the most controversial books in history.