Russian Orthodox Church


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Russian Orthodox Church: Russian Orthodox Cross

Russian Orthodox Church

n.
The Eastern Orthodox Church that is under the leadership of the patriarch of Russia and has autonomous branches in other countries.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Russian Orthodox Church

n
(Eastern Church (Greek & Russian Orthodox)) the national Church of Russia, constituting a branch of the Eastern Church, presided over by the Patriarch of Moscow
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Rus′sian Or′thodox Church′


n.
the autocephalous Eastern Church in Russia: the branch of the Orthodox Church that constituted the established church in Russia until 1917. Also called Rus′sian Church′.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Russian Orthodox Church - an independent church with its own PatriarchRussian Orthodox Church - an independent church with its own Patriarch; until 1917 it was the established church or Russia
Eastern Church, Eastern Orthodox, Eastern Orthodox Church, Orthodox Catholic Church, Orthodox Church - derived from the Byzantine Church and adhering to Byzantine rites
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Russian embassy distanced itself from the individual and the parish, saying Ivanov had no ties to Russian Orthodox Church and never had any.
Relations have improved since the coming to power in the same year of Patriarch Kirill, who headed up the Russian Orthodox Church's diplomatic arm for years.
After its initial stance of resistance to communist oppression, the Russian Orthodox Church as an institution ultimately survived communist rule through tense acquiescence, with its senior ranks deeply infiltrated by the security state, and opponents driven out.
For more than three centuries, Ukraine and Russia have been united in the Russian Orthodox Church. After the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, Ukraine endeavoured to establish religious independence and established an Orthodox Church of the Kiev Patriarchate.
The relations between the Orthodox churches have been strained due to the request of Kiev Patriarchate in Ukraine to gain independence from the Russian Orthodox Church. In 2018, the Kiev Patriarchate sent its request for independence to the Fener Greek Patriarchate in Istanbul.
As church tensions have grown, Ukraine's Security Service has searched Russian Orthodox churches and the homes of Russian Orthodox priests in several cities.
In turn, Metropolitan Hilarion affirmed support of his country and the Russian Orthodox Church to the Syrian people, hoping that the Church would provide the necessary medical support for the wounded in Syria.
The Ukrainian church had been under the Russian Orthodox Church since 1686.
Also, the influence and helpfulness of the Russian Orthodox Church (for years) among the Russian troops and their families cannot be overstated.
Chapter four, entitled "The Confrontation of the Russian Orthodox Church with the Revolution and the New Regime" (pp.
However, considering it's been almost two years since the Russian Orthodox Church ensured Jovan Vraniskovski's release from prison thus helping create conditions for resuming talks, there is an impression that both parties remain entrenched in their positions, which isn't conducive to reaching a compromise.

Full browser ?