Russophobia


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Rus·so·phobe

 (rŭs′ə-fōb′)
n.
One who fears or dislikes Russia or its people or culture.

Rus′so·pho′bi·a n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A standard Kremlin response to complaints is to accuse critics of "Russophobia" (even when they are themselves Russian).
No one will admit this, of course, but here are the facts: the United States, NATO and the EU let their junior partners, who are using blatant Russophobia to build their careers, get away with quite a lot.
"Russophobia is fashion now, one may get some positive dividends from 'elder brothers' and may blame the Russians for everything based on the 'highly likely' principle, announced by [British Prime Minister Theresa May].
This topic has emerged when Russophobia surged in Armenia.
The kids couldn't care less about tax cuts, deregulation, and Russophobia.
Summary: This is in reference to the article 'Is Russophobia making the situation in Ukraine and Crimea worse?' (KT, Dec 6) by professor Mousumi Roy....
Putin has reitertaed that the Russian Federation stands for a full-scale revival of relations with Ukraine.'Kiev, unfortunately, is aimed solely at dissemination of Russophobia and anti-Russian sentiments, blaming Russia for all the bad things happening in this country, while driving its relations with Russia an impasse', said the President.
Leonid Slutsky, the head of the lower house's foreign affairs committee, denounced the sanctions as a manifestation of "unbridled Russophobia" and mockery of international law, saying that Russia may respond with countersanctions.
** The Russian Embassy in Macedonia issued a statement saying that Prime Minister Zoran Zaev and Defense Minister Radmila Sekerinska's arbitrary statements sought to spread Russophobia that through Macedonia's western partners is ever more often accepted as a tool in attaining one's own internal and foreign policy goals.
Russophobia and focus on cultivating closer European ties.