classical conditioning

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Related to S-r theory: classical conditioning

classical conditioning

n. Psychology
A learning process by which a subject comes to respond in a specific way to a previously neutral stimulus after the subject repeatedly encounters the neutral stimulus together with another stimulus that already elicits the response.

classical conditioning

n
(Psychology) psychol the alteration in responding that occurs when two stimuli are regularly paired in close succession: the response originally given to the second stimulus comes to be given to the first. See also conditioned response

con•di•tion•ing

(kənˈdɪʃ ə nɪŋ)

n.
1. a process of changing behavior by rewarding or punishing a subject each time an action is performed.
2. Also called classical conditioning. a process in which a previously neutral stimulus comes to evoke a specific response by being repeatedly paired with another stimulus that evokes the response.
[1915–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.classical conditioning - conditioning that pairs a neutral stimulus with a stimulus that evokes a reflexclassical conditioning - conditioning that pairs a neutral stimulus with a stimulus that evokes a reflex; the stimulus that evokes the reflex is given whether or not the conditioned response occurs until eventually the neutral stimulus comes to evoke the reflex
conditioning - a learning process in which an organism's behavior becomes dependent on the occurrence of a stimulus in its environment
References in periodicals archive ?
Learning is stimulus substitution; learning is on the stimulus side of S-R theory. We must remember that there is no mediation, or language, or thinking with S-R theory.
Continuing the S-R theory of learning, Skinner believed he was changing the operant rate or the working rate of animals.
This emotional learning proposed by Mowrer became the bridge between animal learning (S-R theory) and human learning with the S-O-R theory which included mediation of cognitive and affective processes.