sang

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Related to SANGS: Songs

sang

 (săng)
v.
A past tense of sing.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sang

(sæŋ)
vb
the past tense of sing
Usage: See at ring2

sang

(sæŋ)
n
a Scot word for song
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sing

(sɪŋ)

v. sang, often, sung; sung; sing•ing; v.i.
1. to utter words or sounds in succession with musical modulations of the voice; vocalize melodically.
2. to perform songs or voice compositions.
3. (of an animal) to produce a patterned vocal signal, as in courtship or territorial display.
4. to tell about or praise someone or something in verse or song.
5. to admit of being sung, as verses.
6. to make a whistling, ringing, or whizzing sound: The bullet sang past his ear.
7. to give out a continuous murmuring, burbling, or other euphonious sound.
8. to have the sensation of a ringing or humming sound, as the ears.
9. Slang. to confess or act as an informer; squeal.
v.t.
10. to utter with musical modulations of the voice, as a song.
11. to proclaim enthusiastically: to sing someone's praises.
12. to bring, send, put, etc., with or by singing: to sing a baby to sleep.
13. to chant or intone: to sing mass.
14. to escort or accompany with singing.
15. to tell or praise in verse or song.
16. sing out, to call in a loud voice; shout.
n.
17. a gathering or meeting of people for the purpose of singing: a community sing.
18. a singing, ringing, or whistling sound.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English singan, c. Old Saxon, Old High German singan, Old Norse syngva, Gothic siggwan]
sing′a•ble, adj.

sing.

singular.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sang - North American woodland herb similar to and used as substitute for the Chinese ginsengsang - North American woodland herb similar to and used as substitute for the Chinese ginseng
genus Panax, Panax - perennial herbs of eastern North America and Asia having aromatic tuberous roots: ginseng
ginseng - aromatic root of ginseng plants
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

sing

(siŋ) past tense sang (saŋ) : past participle sung (saŋ) verb
to make (musical sounds) with one's voice. He sings very well; She sang a Scottish song; I could hear the birds singing in the trees.
ˈsinger noun
a person who sings, eg as a profession. Are you a good singer?; He's a trained singer.
ˈsinging noun
the art or activity of making musical sounds with one's voice. Do you do much singing nowadays?; (also adjective) a singing lesson/teacher.
sing out
to shout or call out. Sing out when you're ready to go.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
He worshiped Christ as he had worshiped Woden, and looked upon Him as a hero, only a little more powerful than the heroes of whom the minstrels sang. It was difficult to teach the Saxons the Bible lessons which we know so well, for in those far-off days there were no Bibles.
She sang so beautifully that even the poor fisherman who had so much to do stood and listened when he came at night to cast his nets.
The spectral forms of the lost pack were all about him as he sang and ran in open-eyed dream; the violinist paused in surprise; the men poked the monkey leader of the monkey orchestra and whirled him about wildly raging on his revolving stool; and Johnny laughed.
Spider sang "The Boston Burglar" and "Black Lulu." The Queen sang "Then I Wisht I Were a Little Bird." And her sister Tess sang "Oh, Treat My Daughter Kindily." The fun grew fast and furious.
The sun shone, the birds sang, and the children sang too, and each held the other by the hand; for as yet they had none of them any high office, and were all of equal rank in the eye of God.
All the car was singing a score of songs at once, and Bert, his head pillowed on Mary's breast with her arms around him, started "On the Banks of the Wabash." And he sang the song through, undeterred by the bedlam of two general fights, one on the adjacent platform, the other at the opposite end of the car, both of which were finally subdued by special policemen to the screams of women and the crash of glass.
So the Nightingale sang to the Oak-tree, and her voice was like water bubbling from a silver jar.
And this is the song that Zarathustra sang when Cupid and the maidens danced together:
On came the fairy boat, till it reached a moss-grown rock; and here it stopped, while the Fairies rested beneath the violet-leaves, and sang with the dancing waves.
And when the people grumbled more and more, and some threw stones at the king's grass house, the Bug sang a song of how good it was to be a Fish-Eater.
This praise seemed to please the little fat musicker, for he swelled out his chest, looked important and sang as follows:
One day they went to walk in the wood, that they might be alone; and Jorindel said, 'We must take care that we don't go too near to the fairy's castle.' It was a beautiful evening; the last rays of the setting sun shone bright through the long stems of the trees upon the green underwood beneath, and the turtle-doves sang from the tall birches.