SARS


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SARS

 (särz)
n.
A severe, contagious respiratory illness caused by a coronavirus, characterized by high fever, malaise, dry cough, and pneumonia.

[s(evere) a(cute) r(espiratory) s(yndrome).]

SARS

(sɑːz)
n acronym for
(Pathology) severe acute respiratory syndrome; a severe viral infection of the lungs characterized by high fever, a dry cough, and breathing difficulties. It is contagious, having an airborne mode of transmission

SARS

abbreviation for
South African Revenue Service
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.SARS - a respiratory disease of unknown etiology that apparently originated in mainland China in 2003; characterized by fever and coughing or difficulty breathing or hypoxia; can be fatal
respiratory disease, respiratory disorder, respiratory illness - a disease affecting the respiratory system
Translations

SARS

[sɑːz] N ABBR =severe acute respiratory syndromeneumonía f asiática, SARS m

SARS

[ˈsɑːrz] npneumopathie f atypique

SARS

(Med) abbr of severe acute respiratory syndromeSARS nt, → schweres akutes Atemnotsyndrom

SARS

abbr severe acute respiratory syndrome. V. syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
During outbreaks of SARS and H5N1, a laboratory protocol was established to notify the on-call laboratory professional when a sample was received for testing for 1 of these pathogens (Figure).
They plotted patient residence addresses using a GIS to research such aspects as the superspreading event responsible for more than 300 cases in the Amoy Gardens housing development and microclusters of SARS cases (where the density of infection varied widely between districts).
The virus that causes SARS has spiky molecules called S proteins protruding from its surface.
Scientists think the SARS virus (nonliving particle that invades and reproduces in a living cell) hides in an animal host (organism in or on which another organism lives or feeds).
But very little has changed, judging from a recent trip to the squalid animal market in Guangzhou, where the government ordered 10,000 civets exterminated after the World Health Organization determined the catlike animals carry a virus linked to SARS.
The world held its collective breath during the spring and summer as reports of the spread of the SARS illness came over radio and TV.
Although most existing reports have focused on adult SARS patients, recent reports revealed that the clinical course was less severe in pediatric SARS patients than in adult SARS patients (8,9).
Even though it had the third-worst outbreak of SARS, behind China and Hong Kong, Singapore's death rate was 15 percent, lower than the less severe North America outbreak centered in Toronto.
The good news is that SARS has largely been-contained in the U.
By June 5, 2003, there were 8,400 cases of SARS worldwide and 775 deaths.
At the time, SARS had infected barely 1500 people and caused fewer than 100 deaths in Beijing; tragic, certainly, but not enough to singlehandedly shutter a city of 14 million.