sat

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SAT

 (ĕs′ā-tē′)
A trademark for a set of standardized college entrance examinations.

sat

 (săt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of sit.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sat

(sæt)
vb
the past tense and past participle of sit

sat

(sʌt)
adj
1. very tired; exhausted
2. drunk
[Afrikaans]

SAT

abbreviation for
(Education) (in the US) Scholastic Aptitude Test
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sat

(sæt)

v.
a pt. and pp. of sit.

SAT

Trademark. college admissions tests sponsored by the College Entrance Examination Board: the SAT I measures mathematical and verbal reasoning skills, and the SAT II measures knowledge in specific subject areas.

Sat.

1. Saturday.
2. Saturn.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sat - the seventh and last day of the weekSat - the seventh and last day of the week; observed as the Sabbath by Jews and some Christians
weekday - any day except Sunday (and sometimes except Saturday)
weekend - a time period usually extending from Friday night through Sunday; more loosely defined as any period of successive days including one and only one Sunday
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Sat

abbr of SaturdaySa.
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sit

(sit) present participle sitting: past tense, past participle sat (sӕt) verb
1. to (cause to) rest on the buttocks; to (cause to) be seated. He likes sitting on the floor; They sat me in the chair and started asking questions.
2. to lie or rest; to have a certain position. The parcel is sitting on the table.
3. (with on) to be an official member of (a board, committee etc). He sat on several committees.
4. (of birds) to perch. An owl was sitting in the tree by the window.
5. to undergo (an examination).
6. to take up a position, or act as a model, in order to have one's picture painted or one's photograph taken. She is sitting for a portrait/photograph.
7. (of a committee, parliament etc) to be in session. Parliament sits from now until Christmas.
ˈsitter noun
1. a person who poses for a portrait etc.
2. a baby-sitter.
ˈsitting noun
a period of continuous action, meeting etc. I read the whole book at one sitting; The committee were prepared for a lengthy sitting.
ˈsit-in noun
an occupation of a building etc by protesters. The students staged a sit-in.
ˈsitting-room noun
a room used mainly for sitting in.
sitting target, sitting duck
someone or something that is in an obvious position to be attacked. If they're reducing staff, he's a sitting target.
sit back
to rest and take no part in an activity. He just sat back and let it all happen.
sit down
to (cause to) take a seat, take a sitting position. Let's sit down over here; He sat the child down on the floor.
sit out
1. to remain seated during a dance. Let's sit (this one) out.
2. to remain inactive and wait until the end of. They'll try to sit out the crisis.
sit tight
to keep the same position or be unwilling to move or act. The best thing to do is to sit tight and see if things improve.
sit up
1. to rise to a sitting position. Can the patient sit up?
2. to remain awake, not going to bed. I sat up until 3 a.m. waiting for you!
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

sat

pret & pp de sit
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The SAT scores of more than 3,000 of the children questioned showed those eating what was deemed a "very good" diet gained 11% higher marks than those eating a "very poor" or "neutral" diet.
The report said: "Amongst a sub-sample of students with three or more A grades at A-level there were wide variations in SAT scores.
The editors of The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, struggling to explain the similar puzzle of the educational achievement gap between black and white children, studied the SAT scores of children of military families serving overseas who attended 220 schools run by the U.S.
But McDevitt, a solid student with high SAT scores who intends to major in broadcast journalism, was urged by family and friends to take a look at Temple.
'SAT scores are way down this year, the sharpest decline in 31 years.
In this age of falling SAT scores, alarming drop-out rates, and high school graduates ill-equipped for college, Mayumi and Charlie Pierce stand out as admirable exceptions to the rule.
Zhang is in the top four percent of her class with a grade point average above 4.0 and near perfect SAT scores. She is also an active member of the Westfield High School swim team, a first violinist in the school orchestra and a volunteer at a local children's hospital.
A study of factors regarding verbal SAT scores shows that "the school library collection quality, quantity, and use were the most predictable factors for student success."
Next, we will learn that nanotechnology can be used to buttress our decaying infrastructure, raise our children's SAT scores, maintain a pleat in our trousers.
"But there is no convincing argument that the arts improve SAT scores."
He notes that chess helps students develop critical thinking, problem-solving and analytical skills, and produces high SAT scores and college acceptance rates.
In the '90S, when these changes had become truly ubiquitous, SAT scores rose while suicide and divorce rates went down.