Securities and Exchange Commission

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Se·cu·ri·ties and Exchange Commission

(sĭ-kyo͝or′ĭ-tēz)
n.
A US government agency that supervises the exchange of securities so as to protect investors against malpractice.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Securities and Exchange Commission

n
(Economics) a US federal agency established in 1934 to supervise and regulate issues of and transactions in securities and to prosecute illegal stock manipulations. Abbreviation: SEC
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Securities and Exchange Commission - an independent federal agency that oversees the exchange of securities to protect investors
independent agency - an agency of the United States government that is created by an act of Congress and is independent of the executive departments
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This decision demonstrates Congress's preference for expansion of SEC enforcement authority over that of private litigants.
(167.) See Ferrara et al., supra note 164, at 35-36 (discussing the perceived limitations on SEC enforcement authority and stating that injunctions were "ineffective with respect to certain offenders and particularly onerous for others," and disgorgement "merely required the wrongdoer to return the benefits of the illegal conduct and, thus, did not have a sufficient deterrent effect"); see also H.R.
Although central elements of the Act focus on regulating the financial services sector, it also includes provisions affecting every public company, including enhanced SEC enforcement authority and additional corporate governance requirements.