SGML


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SGML

 (ĕs′jē-ĕm-ĕl′)
n.
A standardized markup language for describing the logical structure of a computer document.

[S(tandard) G(eneralized) M(arkup) L(anguage).]

SGML

abbreviation for
(Journalism & Publishing) standard generalized mark-up language: an international standard used in publishing for defining the structure and formatting of documents

SGML

Standard Generalized Markup Language: a set of standards, approved by the ISO, enabling a user to create an appropriate markup scheme for tagging the elements of an electronic document.
[1985–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.SGML - (computer science) a standardized language for the descriptive markup of documents; a set of rules for using whatever markup vocabulary is adopted
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
markup language - a set of symbols and rules for their use when doing a markup of a document
Translations

SGML

[ˌɛsdʒiːɛmˈɛl] nSGML m
in SGML → en SGML
References in periodicals archive ?
In the appendix for SGML users, the authors state that "The underlying premise of this book is that there is added value in offering full-blown SGML across the Web" (p.
Industrial-strength SGML will not make you an SGML "techie," according to this veteran electronic publishing consultant, but it should help you talk more confidently to those involved in developing a system built around SGML, including document analysts, application designers, vendors, and systems integrators.
These and other problems can be solved by using SGML.
1ST is an excellent source for both the novice and the individual experienced in using SGML.
In the growing library of books about SGML for general readers, a "Special Edition" by Que would normally be many readers' first choice.
From my experience, Developing SGML DTDs is a necessity for both managers and writers.
The perception that SGML benefits writers by allowing them to model and manipulate human language better through the computer recurs frequently in Liora Alschuler's ABCD.