SIDS


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SIDS

 (sĭdz)
abbr.
sudden infant death syndrome

SIDS

abbreviation for
(Pathology) sudden infant death syndrome. See cot death

SIDS

sudden infant death syndrome.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.SIDS - sudden and unexpected death of an apparently healthy infant during sleep
death - the absence of life or state of being dead; "he seemed more content in death than he had ever been in life"
sleep apnea - apnea that occurs during sleep
Translations
Kindstod

SIDS

[ˈsɪdz] n abbr (=sudden infant death syndrome) → SMSN m(= syndrome de mort subite du nourrisson)

SIDS

abbr sudden infant death syndrome. V. syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
The funding is performance-based, which will enable both Government and the SIDS and Kids organisation to assess outcomes and ensure we provide the best services for Territory families.
The team analyzed eight major international studies that examined 2,259 cases of SIDS and 6,894 control infants where death did not occur.
5 Auger and colleagues studied the link between outdoor temperatures and incidence of SIDS over the previous 30 years.
Leading SIDS charity, The Lullaby Trust, says that more action needs to be taken by local authorities and health professionals in Yorkshire to tackle the worryingly high rates of SIDS in the region.
Although cases of cot death or SIDS - the sudden and unexplained death of a baby where no cause is found - have reduced dramatically since the 1980s, it still claims the lives of around five babies every week in the UK.
SIDS deaths peak in infants between ages 2 and 4 months, and then decline, (3) with males more likely to be affected than females.
This means where co-sleeping occurs, there may be an increase in the number of cases of SIDS.
Infants over 6 months old who were put to sleep swaddled had twice the risk of SIDS compared to their age-matched controls.
The Lullaby Trust's chief executive Francine Bates said: "It's incredibly disappointing to see the SIDS rate has not significantly decreased.
The land: sea ratios for the SIDS are largely skewed.
This is because overheating is linked to an increased risk of SIDS.
SIDS face human resources and institutional limitations and are more susceptible to economic and natural shocks.