SSRI


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Related to SSRI: serotonin, SNRI

SSRI

 (ĕs′ĕs-är-ī′)
n.
Any of a class of drugs, such as fluoxetine or sertraline, that inhibit the reuptake of serotonin by neurons of the central nervous system and are primarily used in the treatment of depression and obsessive compulsive disorder.

[s(elective) s(erotonin) r(euptake) i(nhibitor).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

SSRI

abbreviation for
(Pharmacology) selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor; any of a class of drugs, including fluvoxamine, paroxetine, fluoxetine (Prozac), and Lustral, that increase concentrations of serotonin in the brain: used in the treatment of depression
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

SSRI

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor: any of several drugs that inhibit the reabsorption of serotonin by nerve cells, leading to more serotonin activity in the brain: used chiefly as an antidepressant.
[1985–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.SSRI - an antidepressant drug that acts by blocking the reuptake of serotonin so that more serotonin is available to act on receptors in the brain
antidepressant, antidepressant drug - any of a class of drugs used to treat depression; often have undesirable side effects
fluoxetine, fluoxetine hydrocholoride, Prozac, Sarafem - a selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor commonly prescribed as an antidepressant (trade names Prozac or Sarafem); it is thought to work by increasing the activity of serotonin in the brain
paroxetime, Paxil - a selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor commonly prescribed as an antidepressant (trade name Paxil)
sertraline, Zoloft - a selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor commonly prescribed as an antidepressant (trade name Zoloft)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
* if there is no response, or if the depression is moderate or severe, add an SSRI
Research suggests that some SSRIs are associated with an increased risk of suicidal behaviour and thoughts.
DRUG PATROL Reports of adults whose suicidal thoughts and behaviors emerged or worsened during SSRI treatment began to appear in medical journals in 1990.
The SSRI drugs showed a faster reduction in suicide risk than the older types and the suicide risk was higher for people before the drug was started.
For example, Bostwick and Jaffee prescribed buspirone to four patients after the SSRI sertraline had induced bruxism.
"This is great news for those patients currently taking an SSRI," states president William Taylor.
However, he expressed concern that the FDA action is not enough: "The risk of SSRI-induced suicide affects both children and adults," Vickery said, "and although [British regulators] and the FDA have focused on self-directed acts of violence, these drugs can also trigger aggressive acts toward other people." He noted that these risks apply to 'all the SSRI drugs, not just Paxil.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen, when taken on a regular basis, can combine with the SSRIs to cause dangerous gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in some patients.
During the inquest Plaid Cymru AM Leanne Wood raised concerns with the SSRI drug, saying: ``People can become suicidal when they come off this drug.
Dr Misra said psychiatrists rarely prescribe tricyclics now because a newer class of drugs called SSRI - which includes Prozac and Seroxat - is available.
Some patients who discontinue an SSRI (particularly paroxetine) experience a withdrawal syndrome that is characterized by a type of vertigo that occurs in association with visual tracking and is described as visual lag.