SSRI

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SSRI

 (ĕs′ĕs-är-ī′)
n.
Any of a class of drugs, such as fluoxetine or sertraline, that inhibit the reuptake of serotonin by neurons of the central nervous system and are primarily used in the treatment of depression and obsessive compulsive disorder.

[s(elective) s(erotonin) r(euptake) i(nhibitor).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

SSRI

abbreviation for
(Pharmacology) selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor; any of a class of drugs, including fluvoxamine, paroxetine, fluoxetine (Prozac), and Lustral, that increase concentrations of serotonin in the brain: used in the treatment of depression
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

SSRI

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor: any of several drugs that inhibit the reabsorption of serotonin by nerve cells, leading to more serotonin activity in the brain: used chiefly as an antidepressant.
[1985–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.SSRI - an antidepressant drug that acts by blocking the reuptake of serotonin so that more serotonin is available to act on receptors in the brain
antidepressant, antidepressant drug - any of a class of drugs used to treat depression; often have undesirable side effects
fluoxetine, fluoxetine hydrocholoride, Prozac, Sarafem - a selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor commonly prescribed as an antidepressant (trade names Prozac or Sarafem); it is thought to work by increasing the activity of serotonin in the brain
paroxetime, Paxil - a selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor commonly prescribed as an antidepressant (trade name Paxil)
sertraline, Zoloft - a selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor commonly prescribed as an antidepressant (trade name Zoloft)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
SSRIs, another class of antidepressants, were not linked to pregnancy loss.
PRENATAL EXPOSURE to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) was associated with fetal brain development in brain regions important in emotional processing, results of an imaging study show.
Most antidepressants, the big names like Prozac, Zoloft, and Celexa, are classified as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on Meniere's disease (MD) on patients who have both MD and generalized anxiety disorder.
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are likely associated with a moderate increased risk of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding.
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) including citalopram (Celexa[R]), paroxetine (Paxil[R]), and fluoxetine (Prozac[R]) are often prescribed at one-third the dose used to treat depression in order to relieve hot flashes, night sweats, and other menopausal symptoms.
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a class of drugs initially formulated to treat depression, are often used at lower doses to treat hot flashes and night sweats associated with menopause.
Moura and colleagues reviewed data from a large prospective Canadian cohort to assess the association between SSRIs, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and fracture in adults aged 50 and older.
For instance, although Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used around the world for treatment of the patients suffering from depression, they result in sexual dysfunction leading to discontinuation of the treatment [4, 5].
The Question: Does prenatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) use increase the risk of autism and other developmental delays?