Sabbath school


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

sabbath school

n
(Education) (sometimes capitals) chiefly US a school for religious instruction held on the Sabbath

sabbath school

A school held on the Sabbath for religious instruction.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sabbath school - school meeting on Sundays for religious instructionSabbath school - school meeting on Sundays for religious instruction
school - an educational institution; "the school was founded in 1900"
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Wilson, who proposed to keep a Sabbath school for the instruction of such slaves as might be disposed to learn to read the New Testament.
But much as she liked to write for children, Jo could not consent to depict all her naughty boys as being eaten by bears or tossed by mad bulls because they did not go to a particular Sabbath school, nor all the good infants who did go as rewarded by every kind of bliss, from gilded gingerbread to escorts of angels when they departed this life with psalms or sermons on their lisping tongues.
The first Sabbath school was organized April 1889 with Joseph Kelly as superintendent.
He was a peer tutor at school as well as a tutor in the George Town Primary School Tutoring Programme; a member of the Volunteer IMPACT 345 teen service group; a Sabbath School Teacher at the Filadelfia Seventh-Day Adventist Church; and he went on school service trips to Peru, Nicaragua and Costa Rica where he did such tasks as work in a soup kitchen, helped to build a kitchen, painted schools and planted gardens.
According to its constitution, "the object of the Union shall be to secure the organized cooperation of Young Israel of America in behalf of Judaism by securing their active interest in the Congregation and Sabbath School, and by promoting the study of Jewish history, literature and doctrines." (121) However, there is no evidence that the union existed beyond its founding meeting.
27: Responsa, 9 a.m.; Sabbath school, 10 a.m.; second service, 11:15 a.m.
The movement was started in 1883 by Sabbath School teacher William Smith in Glasgow who found his students bored and restless and decided to turn the school into a volunteer band or brigade based on the ideas of "Drill and Discipline".
In one of his opening examples, for instance, he examines the illustrated Sabbath School Meeting Card that was distributed to Protestant parents in the first half of the nineteenth century in order to cultivate attendance at Sabbath Schools.
For missionaries, Native literacy was inseparable from conversion; Edwards informs us that in the records of the Department of Indian Affairs, "the earliest report of a library in any Aboriginal community" is a Sabbath school library conducted in 1864 by the Wesleyan Methodist Society for the Saugeen Chippewas at French Bay on the Bruce peninsula (49).
In a Sabbath Recorder article, published twenty-seven days after the first fire bombing, the reported noted that "along with the letter asking for help [for their damaged church], she has sent a money order to pay for the Helping Hand [lesson booklets] used by her Sabbath School." (15) In spite of the destruction of her church and her own pain and struggles, Johnson had sent money to the denomination to pay her church's bill.
The doctrines of the church called for the formation of a Sabbath school for children.
The society leadership, on the other hand, at first resisted the idea of offering any kind of religious instruction and then expressed a preference for a Reform-oriented sabbath school. Eventually, the HES offered both.