saccade

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Related to Saccadic movement: antisaccade

sac·cade

 (să-käd′, sə-)
n.
A rapid intermittent eye movement, as that which occurs when the eyes fix on one point after another in the visual field.

[French, jerk, jolt, from Middle French, from Old French dialectal saquer, to jerk, pull, variant of Old French sachier, to pull forcefully, turn over, shake up, from sac, sack (perhaps in reference to the shaking of bags of wheat to settle their contents); see sac1.]

sac·cad′ic adj.

saccade

(səˈkɑːd; -ˈkeɪd)
n
1. (Physiology) the movement of the eye when it makes a sudden change of fixation, as in reading
2. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) a sudden check given to a horse
[C18: from French: a jerk on the reins of a horse]

sac•cade

(sæˈkɑd)

n.
a rapid, irregular eye movement that occurs when changing focus from one point to another, as while reading or looking out from a moving train.
[1950–55; < French saccade jerk, jolt < Middle French saqu(er) to pull violently]
sac•cad′ic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.saccade - a rapid, jerky movement of the eyes between positions of rest
eye movement - the movement of the eyes
2.saccade - an abrupt spasmodic movement
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, this study aims to describe and compare the results of ocular tests (saccadic movement, pendular tracking, and optokinetic nystagmus) among the groups with dyslexia, learning disorders and control group.
The techniques used to obtain the pre- and posthyperbaric chamber exposure saccadic movement and SPEM have been described in prior publications from this research team [20].
It is important to note that since attention precedes saccadic movement, fixation duration does not only represent cognitive processing (Theeuwes, et al., 1998), but also preparatory time to the next fixation location.
These corrective saccadic movements might occur after head impulses, resulting in overt catch-up saccades, which are visible and can be detected by an experienced examiner during the bedside test without any additional equipment.
Some previous studies performed similar tests and found that there are many different responses comprising variations of vergence and saccadic movements [19, 33, 34]; however, they did not provide a detailed analysis based on descriptive parameters, as the one we provided by the presented approach.
If it want to improve saccadic movements (eyes movements) it will not get it exercising any type of motility ocular, it will only achieve it by training the saccades; It's more, if it want to train for example horizontal predictive saccades only it will improve if it propose exercises where specifically involved this type of movement ocular and not another.
Caption: Figure 4 Assessment of saccadic movements. The patient is instructed to look at the examiner's finger on the left hand (A) and then the finger on the right hand (B)
While it is known that rotation of the eye results in shearing forces on the retina transmitted from the vitreous gel, saccadic movements also cause a secondary motion of the vitreous itself directed inward to the axis of rotation.