saccade

(redirected from Saccadic system)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

sac·cade

 (să-käd′, sə-)
n.
A rapid intermittent eye movement, as that which occurs when the eyes fix on one point after another in the visual field.

[French, jerk, jolt, from Middle French, from Old French dialectal saquer, to jerk, pull, variant of Old French sachier, to pull forcefully, turn over, shake up, from sac, sack (perhaps in reference to the shaking of bags of wheat to settle their contents); see sac1.]

sac·cad′ic adj.

saccade

(səˈkɑːd; -ˈkeɪd)
n
1. (Physiology) the movement of the eye when it makes a sudden change of fixation, as in reading
2. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) a sudden check given to a horse
[C18: from French: a jerk on the reins of a horse]

sac•cade

(sæˈkɑd)

n.
a rapid, irregular eye movement that occurs when changing focus from one point to another, as while reading or looking out from a moving train.
[1950–55; < French saccade jerk, jolt < Middle French saqu(er) to pull violently]
sac•cad′ic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.saccade - a rapid, jerky movement of the eyes between positions of rest
eye movement - the movement of the eyes
2.saccade - an abrupt spasmodic movement
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, proper functioning of the accommodative system in pre-presbyopes and of the saccadic system in all persons is required for efficient reading [43-44].
OKN is usually considered as one of the canonical oculomotor subsystems, alongside the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), the saccadic system, smooth pursuit/fixational eye movements, and vergence.
Finally, from single-unit recordings it has been well established that at a premotor level, the saccadic system is organized in a Cartesian coordinate system (see Moschovakis & Highstein, 1994 for a review).