Sackville-West


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Sack·ville-West

 (săk′vĭl-wĕst′), Victoria Mary Known as "Vita." 1892-1962.
British writer whose novels include The Edwardians (1930) and All Passion Spent (1931).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Sackville-West

(ˌsækvɪl ˈwɛst)
n
(Biography) Victoria (Mary), known as Vita. 1892–1962, British writer and gardener, whose works include the novel The Edwardians (1930) and the poem The Land (1931). She is also noted for the gardens at Sissinghurst Castle, Kent. Married to Harold Nicolson
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Sack′ville-West′



n.
Dame Victoria Mary ( “Vita” ), 1892–1962, English poet and novelist.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
1WHO ACTRESS Gemma Arterton says she is becoming a keen gardener as a result of her forthcoming film role in Vita And Virginia as writer and horticulture enthusiast Vita Sackville-West. She said at the flower show: "I would like to be a big gardener and I am constantly trying to find new ways to bring it to life.
Minority Voices Theatre will present "Vita & Virginia," a romantic, revealing play adapted from the love letters between Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West. Using their own words, the play chronicles their love affair from their first meeting in 1922 until Woolf's death in 1941.
Eva Green and Gemma Arterton, both straight, will star as literary lovers Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West in a UK film
When Pepita was 25 and already a star dancer in European capitals, she fell in love with Lionel Sackville-West, a young attache to the British legation in Germany, who was equally smitten.
By Vita Sackville-West. (London, United Kingdom: Unicorn Press Ltd, 2014.
Vita Sackville-West's Passenger to Teheran is a 1926 travelogue based on her travels from London to Persia to visit her diplomat husband.
With a large natural swimming pond and writers' retreat, it features a two-storey, oak-framed building inspired by the writing room of poet Vita Sackville-West at Sissinghurst Castle in Kent, a swimming pond edged with water-loving plants, a woodland of river birches, acacias and acers, and a garden with tumbling roses and peonies in a palette of greens, punctuated by soft pinks, lavender blues and creams, and a touch of orange.
It features a two-storey oak framed building inspired by the writing room of poet Vita Sackville-West at Sissinghurst Castle, a swimming pond edged with water-loving plants, a woodland of river birches, acacias and acers, and a garden with tumbling roses and peonies in a palette of greens, punctuated by soft pinks, lavender blues and creams, with a touch of orange.
The Sissinghurst garden was created by writer Vita Sackville-West and her husband, Harold Nicolson.
Written in 1943, this piece commemorates Britten's friendship with Dennis Brain, Edward Sackville-West (to whom it was dedicated), and Britten's partner, Peter Pears.
OF RHUBARB AND ROSES: THE TELEGRAPH BOOK OF THE GARDEN, edited by Tim Richardson is published in hardback by Aurum, priced PS25 THE gardening glitterati past and present, including Bunny Guinness, Vita Sackville-West, Gertrude Jekyll and Fred Whitsey, have all featured in the Telegraph's gardening column since it began in the 1930s.