sacrum

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sacrum

sa·crum

 (sā′krəm, săk′rəm)
n. pl. sa·cra (sā′krə, săk′rə)
A triangular bone made up of five fused vertebrae and forming the posterior section of the pelvis.

[New Latin, from Late Latin (os) sacrum, sacred (bone), sacrum (translation of Greek hieron (osteon), sacred (bone), so called from the use of the sacrum and coccyx of sacrificed animals in divination ), neuter of Latin sacer, sacred, holy; see sacred.]
Word History: The human sacrum consists of five fused vertebrae, to which the coccyx or tailbone—the vestigial remnant of a tail—is attached. In Latin, this large bone was called os sacrum, literally "holy bone." (Os means "bone" in Latin, and sacrum is a form of the Latin adjective sacer, "holy," which is also the source of a number of other English words like sacred, sacrifice, and sacrilege.) The Latin term for the bone is in turn a translation of its Greek name, hieron osteon. (Hieron is a form of the Greek adjective hieros, "holy," while osteon means "bone" in Greek.) In ancient Greek animal sacrifices, certain portions of the victim were reserved for the gods, and among these was the sacrum with the tail still attached. After the gods' portions were placed in the sacrificial fire, a seer or diviner would often observe how the tail curled and sputtered in the flames, and he would interpret these signs as favorable or unfavorable. Greek representations of animal sacrifices on painted ceramics often show the tail curling in the fire and thus revealing the will of the gods.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sacrum

(ˈseɪkrəm; ˈsækrəm)
n, pl -cra (-krə)
1. (Anatomy) (in man) the large wedge-shaped bone, consisting of five fused vertebrae, in the lower part of the back
2. (Zoology) the corresponding part in some other vertebrates
[C18: from Latin os sacrum holy bone, because it was used in sacrifices, from sacer holy]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sac•rum

(ˈsæk rəm, ˈseɪ krəm)

n., pl. sac•ra (ˈsæk rə, ˈseɪ krə)
a bone between the lumbar vertebrae and tail vertebrae, composed of five fused vertebrae that form the posterior pelvic wall.
[1745–55; < Late Latin (os) sacrum holy (bone)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

sa·crum

(sā′krəm, săk′rəm)
A triangular bone at the base of the spine, above the coccyx (tailbone), that forms the rear section of the pelvis. In humans it is made up of five vertebrae that fuse together by adulthood. See more at skeleton.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sacrum

Five fused vertebrae joined to the two hip bones.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sacrum - wedge-shaped bone consisting of five fused vertebrae forming the posterior part of the pelvissacrum - wedge-shaped bone consisting of five fused vertebrae forming the posterior part of the pelvis; its base connects with the lowest lumbar vertebra and its tip with the coccyx
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
sacral vertebra - one of 5 vertebrae in the human spine that fuse in the adult to form the sacrum
pelvic arch, pelvic girdle, pelvis, hip - the structure of the vertebrate skeleton supporting the lower limbs in humans and the hind limbs or corresponding parts in other vertebrates
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

sacrum

[ˈsækrəm] N (sacra (pl)) (Anat) → sacro m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sacrum

nKreuzbein nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sa·crum

n. sacro, hueso triangular formado por cinco vértebras fusionadas en la base de la espina dorsal y entre los dos huesos de la cadera.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sacrum

n (pl -cra) sacro
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Feelings of guilt and shame can congest the free flow of energy in the sacral region.
Physical examination revealed an antalgic gait and tenderness at the lower lumbar region and left posterior iliac and sacral region. Lasegue's sign/ Bragard's sign is positive on left side.
Different methods have been used to measure lumbar and sacral region angles, including goniometry,5 radiography,6 flexible rulers,7 software methods,8 spinal mouses9 and inclinometers.10 Radiography is accepted as the golden standard among all these methods.11
A whitish multinodular irregular soft mass involving the meninges and compressing the spinal cord from the lumbar intumescence to the sacral region was observed.
In the sacral region, the IVVP show a smaller diameter and absence of the rhomboidal arrangement.
The pelvic X-ray showed an area of defect in the sacral region (Figure 1(a)).
Consequently, the surgical treatment of pressure ulcers in the sacral region depends on the patient's individual situation, the cooperation of the family, and previously applied treatments
He also sustained a crush injury to the sacral region with degloving injury of the superior gluteal muscles.
There was a 25 x 20 cm mass of mixed consistency overlying the sacral region, extending to both gluteal regions and partially surrounding the anus (Fig.
It is found that in children who do not bear weight across the sacral region, as in paraplegia, the sacrum and coccyx do not fully fuse.
(Our patient was not aware that she'd had a genital primary HSV-2 infection.) That said, non-genital recurrences in the sacral region and lower extremities occur in up to 60% of patients whose primary genital HSV-2 infection also involved non-genital sites.