sacrum

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sacrum

sa·crum

 (sā′krəm, săk′rəm)
n. pl. sa·cra (sā′krə, săk′rə)
A triangular bone made up of five fused vertebrae and forming the posterior section of the pelvis.

[New Latin, from Late Latin (os) sacrum, sacred (bone), sacrum (translation of Greek hieron (osteon), sacred (bone), so called from the use of the sacrum and coccyx of sacrificed animals in divination ), neuter of Latin sacer, sacred, holy; see sacred.]
Word History: The human sacrum consists of five fused vertebrae, to which the coccyx or tailbone—the vestigial remnant of a tail—is attached. In Latin, this large bone was called os sacrum, literally "holy bone." (Os means "bone" in Latin, and sacrum is a form of the Latin adjective sacer, "holy," which is also the source of a number of other English words like sacred, sacrifice, and sacrilege.) The Latin term for the bone is in turn a translation of its Greek name, hieron osteon. (Hieron is a form of the Greek adjective hieros, "holy," while osteon means "bone" in Greek.) In ancient Greek animal sacrifices, certain portions of the victim were reserved for the gods, and among these was the sacrum with the tail still attached. After the gods' portions were placed in the sacrificial fire, a seer or diviner would often observe how the tail curled and sputtered in the flames, and he would interpret these signs as favorable or unfavorable. Greek representations of animal sacrifices on painted ceramics often show the tail curling in the fire and thus revealing the will of the gods.

sacrum

(ˈseɪkrəm; ˈsækrəm)
n, pl -cra (-krə)
1. (Anatomy) (in man) the large wedge-shaped bone, consisting of five fused vertebrae, in the lower part of the back
2. (Zoology) the corresponding part in some other vertebrates
[C18: from Latin os sacrum holy bone, because it was used in sacrifices, from sacer holy]

sac•rum

(ˈsæk rəm, ˈseɪ krəm)

n., pl. sac•ra (ˈsæk rə, ˈseɪ krə)
a bone between the lumbar vertebrae and tail vertebrae, composed of five fused vertebrae that form the posterior pelvic wall.
[1745–55; < Late Latin (os) sacrum holy (bone)]

sa·crum

(sā′krəm, săk′rəm)
A triangular bone at the base of the spine, above the coccyx (tailbone), that forms the rear section of the pelvis. In humans it is made up of five vertebrae that fuse together by adulthood. See more at skeleton.

sacrum

Five fused vertebrae joined to the two hip bones.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sacrum - wedge-shaped bone consisting of five fused vertebrae forming the posterior part of the pelvissacrum - wedge-shaped bone consisting of five fused vertebrae forming the posterior part of the pelvis; its base connects with the lowest lumbar vertebra and its tip with the coccyx
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
sacral vertebra - one of 5 vertebrae in the human spine that fuse in the adult to form the sacrum
pelvic arch, pelvic girdle, pelvis, hip - the structure of the vertebrate skeleton supporting the lower limbs in humans and the hind limbs or corresponding parts in other vertebrates
Translations

sacrum

[ˈsækrəm] N (sacra (pl)) (Anat) → sacro m

sacrum

nKreuzbein nt

sa·crum

n. sacro, hueso triangular formado por cinco vértebras fusionadas en la base de la espina dorsal y entre los dos huesos de la cadera.

sacrum

n (pl -cra) sacro
References in classic literature ?
The number of the caudal and sacral vertebrae vary; as does the number of the ribs, together with their relative breadth and the presence of processes.
An imaging evaluation is key to the diagnosis of caudal regression syndrome and, while evaluating the images, an assessment of the number of sacral vertebrae and their symmetry should also be made.
Pubic diastasis, fusion of the last sacral vertebrae with agenesis of the coccyx, agenesis of the distal half of the tibia with fibular curvature, and an equinovarus deformation of the left foot.
Spinal X-ray revealed 3 to 4 sacral vertebrae, with no coccyx.
The veins lie in the connective tissue immediately in front of the sacral ala, at the level of the first and second sacral vertebrae [12-14].
Neuroradiologists consider sacrum as part of spinal axis; trauma radiologist as part of skeletal system and abdominal radiologist consider it as a part of pelvis.M Sacrum bone is normally formed by fusion of five sacral vertebrae and articulates with the fifth lumbar vertebra at its base and with coccyx at its apex.
The sacrum is a large, triangular bone formed by the fusion of five sacral vertebrae. It forms the posterosuperior wall of pelvic cavity.