confession

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con·fes·sion

 (kən-fĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act or process of confessing, as in telling one's life story as a series of failings or tribulations.
2. Something confessed, especially a disclosure of one's sins to a priest for absolution.
3. Confession In some Christian churches, the sacrament of Penance.
4. A statement made acknowledging guilt of an offense.
5. An avowal of belief in the doctrines of a particular faith; a creed.
6. A church or group of worshipers adhering to a specific creed.

confession

(kənˈfɛʃən)
n
1. the act of confessing
2. something confessed
3. an acknowledgment or declaration, esp of one's faults, misdeeds, or crimes
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity chiefly RC Church the act of a penitent accusing himself or herself of his or her sins
5. (Ecclesiastical Terms) confession of faith a formal public avowal of religious beliefs
6. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a religious denomination or sect united by a common system of beliefs
conˈfessionary adj

con•fes•sion

(kənˈfɛʃ ən)

n.
1. acknowledgment; avowal; admission.
2. acknowledgment or disclosure of sin, esp. to a priest to obtain absolution.
3. something that is confessed.
4. a formal, usu. written acknowledgment of guilt by a person accused of a crime.
5. a formal profession of religious belief.
6. an organized religious group sharing the same beliefs and doctrines.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin]

Confession

 a religious group; a body or church united by a particular confession of faith. See also communion, congregation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.confession - an admission of misdeeds or faultsconfession - an admission of misdeeds or faults  
admission - an acknowledgment of the truth of something
self-accusation, self-condemnation - an admission that you have failed to do or be something you know you should do or be
2.confession - a written document acknowledging an offense and signed by the guilty party
document, papers, written document - writing that provides information (especially information of an official nature)
3.confession - (Roman Catholic Church) the act of a penitent disclosing his sinfulness before a priest in the sacrament of penance in the hope of absolution
penance - a Catholic sacrament; repentance and confession and atonement and absolution
shrift - the act of being shriven
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
4.confession - a public declaration of your faith
declaration - a statement that is emphatic and explicit (spoken or written)
5.confession - the document that spells out the belief system of a given church (especially the Reformation churches of the 16th century)
church doctrine, religious doctrine, creed, gospel - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that group

confession

noun admission, revelation, disclosure, acknowledgment, avowal, divulgence, exposure, unbosoming His confession was extracted under duress
Proverbs
"Confession is good for the soul"

confession

noun
1. The act of admitting to something:
2. A system of religious belief:
Translations
إعْتِراف للكاهِنإِقْراراعْتِراف، إِقْرار
přiznánízpověďdoznání
tilståelseskrifte
tunnustus
priznanje
gyónásvallomás
játningskriftir, skriftamál
自白
고백
spoveď
priznanje
bekännelse
คำสารภาพ
itirafgünah çıkarma
sự thú nhận

confession

[kənˈfeʃən] N
1. (= act, document) → confesión f
to make a confessionconfesar, hacer una confesión
to make a full confessionconfesarlo todo, confesar de plano
2. (Rel) to go to confessionconfesarse
to hear sb's confessionconfesar a algn
confession of faithprofesión f de fe

confession

[kənˈfɛʃən] n
[crime, murder] → aveu m
(RELIGION)confession f
to go to confession → aller se confesser
to make a confession → faire une confession

confession

n
(= admission)Eingeständnis nt; (of guilt, crime etc)Geständnis nt; on his own confessionlaut eigener Aussage; to make a full confession of something to somebody (Jur also) → jdm ein volles Geständnis einer Sache (gen)ablegen; I have a confession to makeich muss dir etwas beichten (inf)or gestehen; (Jur) → ich möchte ein Geständnis ablegen; “confessions of a … ”Bekenntnisse eines/einer …“; confession magazineZeitschrift fmit Geschichten, die das Leben schrieb
(Eccl: of sins) → Beichte f, → (Schuld- or Sünden)bekenntnis nt; general confessionallgemeines Sündenbekenntnis; confession of faithGlaubensbekenntnis nt; to make one’s confessionseine Sünden bekennen; to hear confession(die) Beichte hören
(= faith)(Glaubens)bekenntnis nt, → Konfession f; what confession are you?welche Konfession or Glaubenszugehörigkeit haben Sie?

confession

[kənˈfɛʃn] nconfessione f
to go to confession → andare a confessarsi
to make one's confession → confessarsi
to hear sb's confession → ascoltare la confessione di qn

confess

(kənˈfes) verb
to make known that one is guilty, wrong etc; to admit. He confessed (to the crime); He confessed that he had broken the vase; It was stupid of me, I confess.
conˈfession (-ʃən) noun
1. acknowledgment of a crime or fault. The youth made a confession to the police officer.
2. (an) act of confessing one's sins to a priest. She went to confession every Friday.
conˈfessional (-ʃə-) noun
the seat etc where a priest sits when hearing confessions.
conˈfessor noun
a priest who hears confessions.

confession

إِقْرار přiznání tilståelse Geständnis ομολογία confesión tunnustus confession priznanje confessione 自白 고백 bekentenis tilståelse wyznanie confissão признание bekännelse คำสารภาพ itiraf sự thú nhận 供认
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Council of Trent, the Roman Catholic Church specified that the sacrament of penance was composed of three parts: contrition, confession, and satisfaction.
Practically overnight, the lines of Saturday afternoons vanished and the hours appointed for confession dwindled as even the most ardent Catholics stayed away." (3) Ten years after Pope Paul VI's approval of the revised Rite of Penance, Pope John Paul II in 1983 convened the Sixth General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops to discuss the related themes of reconciliation and penance, a topic that numerous bishops from around the globe had suggested with concern not only for the church's broad mission of reconciliation (ad intra and ad extra) but also with special urgency for what they assessed to be the troubled state of the sacrament of penance among both laity and clergy.
The Sacrament of Penance reminds us of God's great mercy and indulgence.
Structured like the Catholic ritual sacrament of Penance, by which believers proclaim their sins, resulting in repentance and forgiveness, this piece allows the artist to share his sins in monologues about her immigration, her sexual experiences, and her failures toward filial expectations.
Bergen proposes that the sacrament of penance (which he renames the "sacrament of reconciliation"), drawn from the Catholic tradition, holds promise for the achievement of forgiveness, especially where social groups are seeking the repair of broken relationships.
I have also been able to share in the reconciliation of God's holy people in the sacrament of penance, the joy shared when a couple commits to one another in marriage or holy union service, and I have learned many lessons from the dying and those who fall asleep in faith.
Living on the edge of a large city, I have had the opportunity to sample the way the sacrament of penance is celebrated in a variety of parishes: two downtown parishes, a suburban parish, and a rural church.
In Shakespeare's late, post-tragic plays Pericles, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest, Beckwith (English and theater studies, Duke U.) explores the grammar of forgiveness, its historical contours in the abandoned sacrament of penance, and the changes to it entailed in the revolution of ritual history known now as the English Reformation.
Speaking on Vatican radio, Archbishop Mauro Piacenza said the sacrament of penance had suffered a "deep crisis" for decades: "Ever decreasing numbers of people see a clear difference between good and evil, truth and lies and sin and virtue."
In Misericordia Dei (On Certain Aspects of the Celebration of the Sacrament of Penance), John Paul II (2002) expressed his concern that the Church had drifted from its moral moorings.
He wished to receive the Sacrament of Penance. A local parish priest, Father Timothy Mockaitis, received the request and heard the confession.
"Persons in this condition should not receive Holy Communion until and unless they are reconciled to God in the Sacrament of Penance, lest they eat and drink their own condemnation."