Sacramento


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Sac·ra·men·to

 (săk′rə-mĕn′tō)
The capital of California, in the north-central part of the state northeast of San Francisco. The city was founded as a mining camp on John Sutter's land (where gold was discovered in 1848) and became the state capital in 1854. It was named for the Sacramento River, which rises near Mount Shasta and flows about 610 km (380 mi) southward through the fertile Sacramento Valley to an extension of San Francisco Bay.

Sacramento

(ˌsækrəˈmɛntəʊ)
n
1. (Placename) an inland port in N central California, capital of the state at the confluence of the American and Sacramento Rivers: became a boom town in the gold rush of the 1850s. Pop: 445 335 (2003 est)
2. (Placename) a river in N California, flowing generally south to San Francisco Bay. Length: 615 km (382 miles)

Sac•ra•men•to

(ˌsæk rəˈmɛn toʊ)

n.
1. the capital of California, in the central part, on the Sacramento River. 376,243.
2. a river flowing S from N California to San Francisco Bay. 382 mi. (615 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sacramento - a city in north central California 75 miles to the northeast of San Francisco on the Sacramento RiverSacramento - a city in north central California 75 miles to the northeast of San Francisco on the Sacramento River; capital of California
Calif., California, Golden State, CA - a state in the western United States on the Pacific; the 3rd largest state; known for earthquakes
References in classic literature ?
Two months had come and gone before the convalescent in the Sacramento hospital was identified with Kirkman, the absconding San Francisco clerk; even then, there must elapse nearly a fortnight more till the perfect stranger could be hunted up, the portmanteau recovered, and John's letter carried at length to its destination, the seal still unbroken, the inclosure still intact.
Eleven thousand men, women, and children were shot down on the streets of Sacramento or murdered in their houses.
Hours afterward, in the fires of sunset, where the Sacramento and the San Joaquin tumble their muddy floods together, I took the New York Cut-Off, skimmed across the smooth land-locked water past Black Diamond, on into the San Joaquin, and on to Antioch, where, somewhat sobered and magnificently hungry, I laid alongside a big potato sloop that had a familiar rig.
Among other offerings, we were permitted to handle the jewelled belt presented to the pugilist by the State of Nevada, a gold brick from the citizens of Sacramento, and a model of himself in solid silver from the Fisticuff Club in New York.
In another moment he had taken out the jewelled belt presented to Maguire by the State of Nevada, the solid silver statuette of himself, and the gold brick from the citizens of Sacramento.
Sacramento gives us our appropriations and therefore we kowtow to Sacramento, and to the Board of Regents, and to the party press, or to the press of both parties.
Alongside them were clippers of all sizes, steamers of all nationalities, and the steamboats, with several decks rising one above the other, which ply on the Sacramento and its tributaries.
From one of these, a scow-schooner captain who plied up and down the bay and the San Joaquin and Sacramento rivers, Daughtry had the promise of being engaged as cook and sailor on the schooner Howard.
Some years afterward I met in Sacramento a man named Morgan, to whom I had a note of introduction from a friend in San Francisco.
Once, for one short instant, they had got the Sacramento call, then the wires, somewhere, were cut again.
To the left was the mouth of the Sacramento River, to the right the mouth of the San Joaquin.
In Sacramento was a railroad Governor who might reprieve or even pardon bank-wreckers and grafters, but who dared not lift his finger for a workingman.

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