sago

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sa·go

 (sā′gō)
n. pl. sa·gos
A powdery starch obtained from the pith of certain palm trees and cycads, used as a staple food chiefly in Asia and as a food thickener.

[Malay sagu, mealy pith.]

sago

(ˈseɪɡəʊ)
n
(Cookery) a starchy cereal obtained from the powdered pith of a sago palm, used for puddings and as a thickening agent
[C16: from Malay sāgū]

sa•go

(ˈseɪ goʊ)

n.
a starch derived from the pith of sago palms and used in making puddings.
[1545–55; earlier sagu < Malay]

Sago

A drink for the sick made by dissolving a spoonful of sago starch in a cup of hot water.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sago - powdery starch from certain sago palmssago - powdery starch from certain sago palms; used in Asia as a food thickener and textile stiffener
amylum, starch - a complex carbohydrate found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice; an important foodstuff and used otherwise especially in adhesives and as fillers and stiffeners for paper and textiles
pearl sago - sago ground into small round grains
Translations
ساغو: دَقيق النَّخِل
ságo
sago
szágószágólisztszágópálma
sagu
sagógrjón
サゴヤシサゴ澱粉
sago
sago
Hint irmiğisagu

sago

[ˈseɪgəʊ]
A. Nsagú m
B. CPD sago palm Npalmera f sagú

sago

[ˈseɪgəʊ] n
(= substance) → sagou m
(= dessert) → sagou m au laitsago pudding nsagou m au lait

sago

nSago m

sago

[ˈseɪgəʊ] nsagù m inv

sago

(ˈseigəu) noun
a starchy substance obtained from inside the trunk of certain palm trees; (also adjective). sago pudding.
References in periodicals archive ?
AVA President Dr Paula Parker said: Cycads or Sago palms have become quite popular.
At one extreme the sago palms flourish under swamp or even flooded conditions [1].
Von Poser carefully describes food as an element of interactional order, discussing where and how people offer food, consume food, tend sago palms and produce sago, and talk about food (or not), as sites for performing their relationships.
Sago palms continued to yield material for starchy-sweet onaw.
Kawabe examines the Giddra people of the New Guinea lowland, who may not be considered hunters because they also cultivate sago palms and practice slash-and-burn agriculture as well as hunt with bows in the forest.
Bayogan's technologies are seen to benefit the farmers who are into the production of sago palms, durian, mangosteen, papaya, pomelo, mango, banana, santol, yam tubers, potato, cabbage, snap beans, and flowers such as roses, birds of paradise, and torch ginger inflorescences.
Some household plants like azaleas and rhododendrons, tulips and daffodils and sago palms
Aristocrats owned the sago palms and the swamp land on which they grew.
Before flowering plants emerged, the seed-bearing plant world was dominated by gymnosperms, which have cone-like structures instead of flowers and include pine trees, sago palms and ginkgos.
The sago palms grow all over Southeast Asia, and are used as staple foods in places where there is insufficient rain to grow wet rice.
Certainly, more remote palms are less likely to be tended, and palms in a village tended more than others, but between these extremes there is a continuum: hence the often reported description of sago palms as 'semi-wild'.
Sago serves as a natural social forest where exploitation of sago palms are undertaken through clan socio-cultural obligation wherein ownership issues are merely acknowledged through oral tradition, by passing history of sago palm management from one generation to the next by word of mouth.